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According to EEOC regulations you can't get discriminated for equal employment opportunities for employment, and some civilian agencies are the military equivalent, so with that said you can't be denied the benefits that military can receive for being employed in the civilian equivalent job, so how do the benefits get administered where the VA would normally administer the benefits?

I have the following:
bad eyesight (unwaiverable)
campaign service medal

  • Back up a second. Why do you get veteran's benefits without being a veteran? Because it takes more than the fact that there exists an Equal Employment Opportunities Commission to justify the claim that Congress really meant to say people who were not medically qualified to join the military but who had a civilian role must be treated like veterans. – cpast Feb 17 '16 at 6:42
  • Congress sanctioned the GWOT service medal, and if you get denied at MEPS you need to be able to qualify equally to them even if you get denied due to something minor, and you did exactly what they did in a slightly different capacity. example: Merchant Marine for being denied from sailing with the Navy, when you still sailed for the Navy. If the National guard gets called up by the Army/Air Force, they get veteran status, so a merchant marine getting called up for transporting cargo for the navy they qualify. – a coder Feb 17 '16 at 7:13
  • Er, no. There's a big difference: Members of the National Guard are enlisted or commissioned in the armed forces of the United States. They are not civilians. They are soldiers and airmen, exactly the same as those on active duty. The Merchant Marine are not; they are civilians. And again, you have not cited any actual reason you'd need to be considered the equal of a member of the armed forces for veterans benefits based on some equal opportunity theory. – cpast Feb 17 '16 at 7:38
  • discrimination in employment is illegal, and many loopholes exist. Where is the case laws supporting the difference between merchant marine called up by the navy, and navy reserve called up by the navy? – a coder Feb 17 '16 at 7:47
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    Again, you are spouting platitudes without a shred of actual evidence that the law requires non-military personnel to be treated like military personnel (reservists are military personnel, not civilians). Discrimination in employment is quite legal in general. Certain types of discrimination are illegal. However, those laws tend not to apply to military personnel, because the military is different. And Congress is not bound by federal antidiscrimination laws when it sets up veterans benefits programs. Try contacting your members of Congress. – cpast Feb 17 '16 at 8:01

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