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This came up in a comment discussion on a news story of someone selling prints of models that were licensed CC-BY-NC-ND.

Ignoring that the seller themselve seems pretty clueless and we can disregard their defence, the question comes up in the comments: is a 3d printed object a derivative work of it's design file and if so, in what jurisdictions?

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  • Reading the full text of your news story is fun -- the defence used is that other people violates the license, so the license is not valid
    – Soren
    Commented Feb 23, 2016 at 18:00
  • @Soren "the defense[sic] used is that other people violates the license, so the license is not valid" I don't think it's quite that simple, it's probably along the lines of "You are hosting your design on a site that makes money and is obviously commercial so it doesn't make sense that you legitimately believe it is a non-commercial license"
    – Sam
    Commented Feb 23, 2016 at 22:51
  • @Sam besides your point but "defense" is the American spelling of "defence", no need to add "[sic]".
    – kasbah
    Commented Feb 24, 2016 at 15:26
  • @kasbah Huh, you learn something new every day. I think you mean "defence" is the Brittish spelling of "defense" :P
    – Sam
    Commented Feb 24, 2016 at 17:42

2 Answers 2

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Yes, the print is a derivative work in exactly the same way that a building is derivative work of the architectural and engineering plans.

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Yes, the print is a derivative work. This is because it wouldn't be able to fundamentally exist without the file.

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