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I want to manufacture and sell an electronic device which I made using some TI components at home. Can I use TI's logo and other logos such as 'Burr-Brown audio' and their names on my product packaging?

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    I have a computer with "Intel inside" which is clear that the product itself is not manufactured by Intel. You must avoid "passing off" your work as that of someone else. You might need their permission too? How would they feel if your product, in the worst of all worlds, was terrible and reflected badly on its components? Feb 14 at 8:32
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    Intel inside is a marketing effort of Intel’s. Originally the manufacturer got to piggy back on discounted advertising negotiated with many publications by Intel. There may have been strings attached to the program at one time by Intel - like no PC products from the company with other than Intel CPUs. Feb 14 at 21:18
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    @WeatherVane Manufacturers generally cannot use the Intel Inside logo. Those you see with the Intel Inside sticker are manufacturers paid by Intel to include the sticker on their product. It is actually very easy to get Intel's permission as well as Intel's money (discounted CPU prices) to put the Intel Inside sticker on a laptop but Intel does not give permission to all products containing Intel CPUs. For example they don't want traffic lights to have the Intel Inside logo.
    – slebetman
    Feb 15 at 3:47
  • @WeatherVane "You must avoid "passing off" your work as that of someone else." This isn't a question of plagiarism. Feb 15 at 12:31
  • @GregoryCurrie it is however a question of trademark infringement.
    – jwenting
    Feb 15 at 13:58

2 Answers 2

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You will need to obtain permission from the company whose logo you intend to use before using it. Just because you use a product from that company in your devices doesn't necessarily give you permission to use their logo.

Many companies have co-marketing plans that you can apply to be a part of but generally you and your product must meet certain requirements in order to be a part of it.

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    other companies offer mere contracts of adhesion, aka "Usage guidelines"
    – Trish
    Feb 14 at 10:45
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    To extend to the "why" - this is for the obvious reason that Burr-Brown doesn't want their name stuck to a rubbish amplifier design that makes their parts look bad.
    – J...
    Feb 14 at 21:55
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Some companies have explicit usage guidelines. For example, Intel dictates when you can and when you can't use the intel-logo on machines that you build.

These usage guidelines do grant a limited license and tell in part for what you need a further license.

You may refer to Intel products and services by their associated Intel trademarks and service marks, so long as such references (a) are truthful, fair, and not misleading, and (b) comply with these guidelines

For example, you can not use the logos without a further license that allows it, as that doesn't comply with the guidelines under b:

  • Do not make unlicensed use of Intel's licensed logos, such as the Intel Inside® logo. Third-party use of Intel logos requires a license or written permission from Intel. If you are interested in obtaining a license to use an Intel mark or logo, contact your Intel marketing or sales representative, or your local Intel sales office

On the other hand, saying that the board is Intel when it is not, would violate the truthful part of the guidelines under a.

So by placing a sticker without the proper license or claiming it is a part that it isn't it, you become unlicensed and that means you are in violation of the contract of adhesion formed by the guidelines and possibly trademark rights.

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    The linked page is very explicitly not a license, because it says this: "Do not make unlicensed use of Intel's licensed logos, such as the Intel Inside® logo. Third-party use of Intel logos requires a license or written permission from Intel. If you are interested in obtaining a license to use an Intel mark or logo, contact your Intel marketing or sales representative, or your local Intel sales office[.]"
    – Kevin
    Feb 14 at 21:25
  • @Trish: The guidelines are far too vague as to what would be required to justify an "Intel Inside" sticker to be regarded as granting an implicit license. If a manufacturer found a crate of new-old-stock 5Mhz 8088 chips included a circuit that used it to blink some front-panel LEDs, but the main CPU was from AMD, would that justify an "Intel Inside" sticker?
    – supercat
    Feb 14 at 23:23
  • @supercat Is it clearer now?
    – Trish
    Feb 14 at 23:28
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    @Trish: Certain uses of trademarks do not require any kind of license, because a company would have no authority to forbid them; Intel's guidelines are essentially a recitation of such uses. What's critical, and could perhaps have been made clearer, is that someone making nominative fair use of a trademark must avoid anything that might imply endorsement from the trademark holder.
    – supercat
    Feb 14 at 23:37
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    @supercat OP asks about logos specifically, which are not nominative use.
    – Trish
    Feb 15 at 0:11

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