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In the UK an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) is required for the sale of a residential property.
I have 3 questions about these:

1) Is it correct that these have a 10 year validity?

2) Would a legal extension to the house change the EPC validity, for instance a conservatory with a large window area?

3) Can the EPCs retrievable from the EPC Register be used legally for a sale?

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1) Is it correct that these have a 10 year validity?

Yes.

2) Would a legal extension to the house change the EPC validity, for instance a conservatory with a large window area?

Generally, no. This official document states (on p18-19) that:

An internal refit with new heating, hot water, air conditioning or mechanical ventilation etc., would not trigger the requirement for an EPC, unless the building were also converted so as to comprise more or fewer parts for separate use1. Any refit will, however, be subject to such of the Building Regulations as are applicable to the work.

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3) Can the EPCs retrievable from the EPC Register be used legally for a sale?

Both the register website, and the relevant page from the government website, appear to suggest that yes, you can.


Footnote 1 (from the same document):

A part of a building designed or altered to be used separately is where the accommodation is made or adapted for separate occupation.

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    Thank you. Shows these are not very serious yet if you can in principle replace gas with resistive electric heating without changing the EPC or add massively to the window area without any requirements for the heat retention of the windows. (I could understand if improvements could be ignored until the next one, on the other hand) Anyway, this might help somebody I know. – nsandersen Mar 21 '16 at 15:40
  • I have yet to meet anyone who takes EPCs seriously. The assessor isn't able to do anything else which damages the property (e.g. test walls for cavity insulation) so must take (IMHO) an educated guess. If you're buying a property, then the survey already covers some of this in a lot more detail. If you're planning to rent, then I guess it could be useful - but you're going to have no control over any improvements. – Steve Melnikoff Mar 21 '16 at 15:57
  • I always look at/feel the windows, check the loft insulation, heating type/heating appliance ages plus ventilation arrangements (here typically meaning the number of holes in the walls!) and try to avoid single leaf walls rather than taking the EPC too seriously.. But I think the idea is good, just needs to be done properly. – nsandersen Mar 21 '16 at 16:11

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