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A worker in the UK is employed by a managed service company.

They are going to lose their job because the MSC's client plans to remove that specific worker's role from the contract between the MSC and client.

This, in effect, forces the MSC to make the worker redundant because the MSC has only one client and therefore have no work for the employee.

The reason driving this change is so that this worker specifically will be terminated due to thier extended sickness. They have been out sick for 2 weeks and provided a sicknote for a further 4 weeks.

This may well be right and legal but it feels wrong. A way to get around all the reasons someone might be protected against termination. Someone waves a hand and the work 'goes away' and THATs the reason they got the shove from their actual employer, even though the client pulling the strings effectively forced the dismissal because X, Y or Z.

I'd like to know whether or not this is all legal and above board or how best to find out.

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    "Sacked" and "redundancy" are not the same thing. Which is it?
    – user35069
    Jun 20, 2022 at 15:59
  • Please clarify your specific problem or provide additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it's hard to tell exactly what you're asking.
    – Community Bot
    Jun 20, 2022 at 15:59
  • @Community Updated. Sorry for the lack of clarity. Would appreciate help rephrasing. Situation: A worker, employed by a managed service company, is going to loose their job because the MSC's client plans to remove that specific worker's role from the contract between the MSC and client. This, in effect, forces the MSC to make the worker redundant even though the reason driving this change is so that he specifically will be terminated due to his extended sickness. I wanted to learn whether this is all legal and above board or not. Jun 20, 2022 at 16:07
  • Thanks for the clarity, I have now retracted my vote to close
    – user35069
    Jun 21, 2022 at 11:28

1 Answer 1

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I'd like to know ... how best to find out.

These links may assist:

There are certain rights when someone is made redundant, one being:

You must be selected for redundancy in a fair way, for example because of your level of experience or capability to do the job.

And one can get advice from:

Acas (Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service) or Citizens Advice.

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