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Alberta's driver's guide says "when you intend to use the first available exit, approach the circle (even though you are already in the circle, intending to exit ...) using the right lane. It also says "when you intend to leave at any other exit, approach the circle (you are already in the circle, but the guide tells you to approach it again ... confusing) using the left lane. My question is: What's the difference between the first available exit and any other exit? I thought if you are in the right lane, you have to stay in that lane when exiting. And if you are in the left lane, you have to stay in that lane when exiting. This is all very confusing to me. Please help and thank you!

"Exiting circular intersections

Always wait to activate your right turn signal after passing the exit that is before your intended exit. This tells other drivers that you intend to leave the circle at the next exit.

When you intend to use the first available exit:

• Approach the circle using the right lane. • Use your right signal as you approach. Leave it on until you have exited the circle. • As you approach, scan for pedestrians and cyclists at the crosswalks at the entrance and exits of the circle. • Yield to traffic in the circle. • Exit the circle using the right lane.

When you intend to leave at any other exit:

• Approach the circle using the left lane. • Activate your left signal to communicate that you do not plan to use the first exit. • As you approach, scan for pedestrians and cyclists at the crosswalks at the entrance and exits of the circle. • Yield to traffic in the circle. • Exit the circle using the left lane."

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    It certainly is confusing. Their own diagrams contradict their advice: although they say that if you don't intend to take the first exit, you should use the left (inside) lane, the diagrams show vehicles using the right (outside) lane but going past the first exit. I don't believe N. America yet understands roundabouts. But to your question, the 'first available exit' is the first exit. and 'any other exit' is those which are not the first exit. Jan 15, 2023 at 7:50
  • Sometimes there are roads approaching the circle/roundabout that you aren't allowed to go down, for instance a one-way exit from a freeway. That's why it says "first available exit" not just "first turning" or something else less specific.
    – Stuart F
    Jan 27, 2023 at 15:46

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I think you have understood it correctly. And the diagrams make things clearer as to why, when you are intending to use an exit other than the first exit, it is better to enter the two-lane roundabout via the left lane. The reason is because if you are in the right lane and do not exit, you must be alert to the need to yield to left-lane traffic that might be exiting.

Using the left lane when you have planned ahead-of-time that you will not be using the first exit helps avoid a potential yield situation.

The guide seems to emphasize that the lane you enter is the lane you should stay in throughout and is the lane you should end up exiting from. This is clear from the diagrams showing that you can exit directly from the left lane (by crossing through the right lane on the way out); it's captioned "Vehicle H must yield to vehicle G."

As far as I can tell, none of that is prescribed by regulation other than the requirement to yield to left-lane traffic. But the material in the guide might inform the standard of care (see also an Alberta example), and following the guide might be expected as part of a driving test.

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