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The link says "drivers should not stop in a 'no stopping zone' because they may interfere with other vehicles that are turning from one roadway to another. This is usually where large vehicles need extra room to turn."

Is the link suggesting that there is no need to stop before reaching the crosswalk lines? But isn't it dangerous for the pedestrians in this case?

I have attached an image in that link to clarify my question.

enter image description here

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  • Your link is broken. Please clarify whether the question is about no stopping zones to allow large vehicles to turn, or rules about crosswalks for pedestrian safety. Apr 29, 2023 at 18:16
  • Thank you for letting me know that there is something wrong with the link. I have attached an image in that link to try and clarify my question.
    – Maurice
    Apr 29, 2023 at 19:20
  • The link is still broken, but I suppose it means you cannot stop for pedestrians right at the crosswalk, because of the 'no stopping zone' just before it. You must stop further back. Not on the crosswalk, because a) it's dangerous for pedestrians and b) you'll give large vehicles even less room to turn. The idea is to give them room to turn. Apr 29, 2023 at 19:39
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    @AndrewLeach: It's an actual roadway marking. See for instance 2 St SW at 17 Ave SW in Calgary. Apr 30, 2023 at 14:03

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Both rules apply. You must as always stop before the crosswalk, and additionally you must not stop inside the no stopping zone. Therefore, in order to comply with both, you have to stop behind the no stopping zone.

Another way to look at it is that it is equivalent to having a stop line that is further back from the intersection than usual. The large X in between just provides a visual indication that this is the stop line for the intersection and that you should not go past it until you have the right of way to proceed.

In this aerial photo of 2 St SW and 17 Ave SW in Calgary, you can see that the back line of the no stopping zone is wider, apparently the same width as the stop line in the adjacent lane, which is another signal that the back line serves as a stop line.

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