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Is it legally permissible for co-inventors to sign a Power of Attorney (PoA) document at separate locations with only their own signatures in the witness of independent notaries, leaving everyone else's signature blank, and then return the original hand signed inked individual documents to the law firm, if they are unable to meet at the same location due to time or financial constraints?

N parties, 1 Document, N parties signing 1 Document with N-notaries asynchronously

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  • So do you want, for N parties, N different but identical documents, each signed by one party?
    – SJuan76
    May 12, 2023 at 16:38
  • N parties, 1 Document, N parties signing 1 Document with N-notaries asynchronously
    – Coo
    May 12, 2023 at 17:20
  • This seems like an ideal scenario for electronically signed documents, is that not an option?
    – Cadence
    May 13, 2023 at 22:07

1 Answer 1

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Yes.

This is legal and it is done routinely. It is called executing a document in counterparts.

To be clear, however, as the language of the question is ambiguous on this point, each signature would have to be contemporaneously notarized by the person notarizing that particular signature.

In each case that a notarization took place outside the country where the Power of Attorney is to be utilized, normally, it would be necessary to also obtain an apostille for that notarization. An apostille is an official declaration of a designated official in the country of notarization that the notary of the signature in question was, in fact, a notary in good standing at the time that the notarization was done.

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