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I want to check up on a second hand car dealer in the UK to see if they've had any small claims court cases against them (and preferably the result of these cases). Is there any publicly available resource to see this kind of information?

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This answer applies only to England and Wales.

Unpaid County Court Judgments, and those that remained unpaid for thirty days after being handed down, are a matter of public record. They are held on the Register of Judgments, Orders and Fines by virtue of The Register of Judgments, Orders and Fines Regulations 2005. Judgments against individuals and corporations are both held.

The register contains—

  • the full name and address of the debtor in respect of whom the entry in the Register is to be made;

  • if the entry is to be in respect of an individual, that individual’s date of birth (where known);

  • the amount of the debt;

  • the case number;

  • the name of the court which made the judgment; and

  • the date of the judgment. (abstracted from r10 of the Regulations).

The registrar is currently Trust Online. The CCJ register can be searched for a fee of £4 per search. Registers for other parts of the UK are also held.

  • To clarify - is the judgement removed once paid? – jimsug Jul 7 '15 at 9:09
  • If it's paid later than thirty days after being handed down, it will remain on the register for six years. – Flup Jul 7 '15 at 9:10
  • When is the judgement considered unpaid? I imagine there would be some time allowed for payment, and not all judgements will be recorded? – jimsug Jul 7 '15 at 9:19
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    All money judgments are recorded. They will be marked as 'satisfied' when paid in full and, if paid within thirty days, will be erased from the register. If paid after that time, they will remain on the register for six years but will still be marked 'satisfied'. – Flup Jul 7 '15 at 9:21

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