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The Enterprise Edition of MySQL database server has a subscription-based license that charges users based on the number of active CPU sockets a user has in posession. However, M1 Ultra and M2 Ultra are such kind of "combo" SOCs, where 2 M1/M2 Max chips are "glued" together using some kind of high-bandwidth communication channel, creating a kind of double.

Legally, would users have to pay for 2 CPU sockets' license to use it on 1 Mac Studio/Pro equipped with M1/M2 Ultra?

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    Perhaps if you posted the relevant part(s) of the license that you have questions about. But my first impression is that the specific implementation of the multi-CPU system doesn't matter while the fact that you have multiple CPUs in the system does matter.
    – jwh20
    Commented Nov 3, 2023 at 9:16
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    Careful reading of the licensing is probably necessary, and possibly actual legal advice given the dollar values that can be involved. However, the page says "Socket: is defined as a slot that houses a chip (or a multi-chip module), which contains a collection of one or more cores." It seems likely that an Ultra CPU would be a single multi-chip/multi-die CPU module, even though I assume they are soldered rather than socketed. Commented Nov 3, 2023 at 9:24

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This has been a fairly common practice since the Intel Pentium D at least, and AMD is using a similar technique today. That's where the notion of counting "sockets" comes from. And there's consensus that such MCM's (multi-chip modules) count as a single socket.

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  • Has this (MCM counting in a single socket) ever been disputed? I imagine some actual cases could be a plus to this answer. "None that's aware" would also be fine.
    – DannyNiu
    Commented Nov 3, 2023 at 11:18
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    @DannyNiu Oracle's high-end software uses a model-specific core factor allowing all these factors to be adjusted, and it seems commercial factors (charging more for less-popular platforms) as well.
    – user71659
    Commented Nov 3, 2023 at 17:38

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