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I have family members who work in the US Marshals that I will be seeing soon for Thanksgiving.

While I can certainly submit tips to the FBI, such process is rather impersonal and is just more cumbersome than talking to a relative in federal law enforcement, who agency's mission is the apprehension of federal fugitives.

Given the January 6 rioters have all been federally charged and have active arrest warrants for felonies / misdemeanors:

Would the US Marshals have legal jurisdiction to arrest and bring in front of a judge such folks?

Is legal jurisdiction to arrest dependent on the taskforce / unit assignment?

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    Your relative or in-law might might or might not be able to act even if he has jurisdiction, as there are internal regulations about sources that the general public is not privy to. On a social/interpersonal level: don't spoil Thanksgiving dinner, ask them at another time - such as calling the officer in the office, when they can look up the warrant if needed.
    – Trish
    Nov 19, 2023 at 9:40
  • @Trish, regulations about sources? Are you saying tips from families may not be actionable?
    – Anthony
    Nov 19, 2023 at 15:46
  • No, but at times sources need to be vetted or crosschecked, at times by agents other than that that got the hint. Those are usually internal regulations.
    – Trish
    Nov 19, 2023 at 15:48
  • Why wouldn't you simply ask said relatives?
    – Michael
    Dec 2, 2023 at 19:03

1 Answer 1

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Would the US Marshals have concurrent jurisdiction to arrest January 6 protesters with active federal warrants along with the FBI?

Would the US Marshals have legal jurisdiction to arrest and bring in front of a judge such folks?

The U.S. Marshals are the primary federal law enforcement agency that is charge of executing active federal arrest warrants. The FBI has jurisdiction to do so as well, but this is a secondary part of their mission.

Is legal jurisdiction to arrest dependent on the taskforce / unit assignment?

No.

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  • It seems that the first paragraph implies the answer "yes," but perhaps it would be clearer to say this explicitly. Is there a reason you didn't?
    – phoog
    Nov 19, 2023 at 19:42
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    @phoog I didn't say "yes" because the question implies, although it doesn't say so, explicitly, that the FBI is the primary agency charged with enforcing federal arrest warrants.
    – ohwilleke
    Nov 19, 2023 at 21:11

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