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I know that in the US Double Jeopardy protection means that if you are acquitted the prosecution cannot attempt to appeal or retry you (except for very narrow exceptions). However, a defendant is often charged with multiple counts of crimes in the same trial. Suppose they are acquitted of all charges except one. If they decide to appeal the conviction and they succeed on their appeal, does that open them up to re-prosecution on the other charges that were originally brought against them, or is the appeal guaranteed to only be on the charges they were successfully convicted for?

Related question: It is unfortunately the case in the US that you can still received enhanced sentences for things you were acquitted for when you are still found guilty for other related charges. Lets suppose you are partially re-convicted on appeal for the charges you appealed. Assuming you beat at least one additional charge, I would assume this would result in a re-sentencing (is this correct?). If so, would the Judge/Jury still be allowed to consider the alleged conduct that was considered way back in the first trial (that you beat way back then)?

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Suppose they are acquitted of all charges except one. If they decide to appeal the conviction and they succeed on their appeal, does that open them up to re-prosecution on the other charges that were originally brought against them, or is the appeal guaranteed to only be on the charges they were successfully convicted for?

Only the charge of conviction which is appealed can be retried.

It is unfortunately the case in the US that you can still received enhanced sentences for things you were acquitted for when you are still found guilty for other related charges.

At least in federal court and as a matter of U.S. Constitutional law. Not all U.S. states allow this to be done.

Lets suppose you are partially re-convicted on appeal for the charges you appealed. Assuming you beat at least one additional charge, I would assume this would result in a re-sentencing (is this correct?).

The original sentence for the charge upon which you are reconvicted would cap the sentence that could be imposed on that charge when you are retried and reconvicted. Subject to that, you could be, but wouldn't have to be, resentenced on that charge. The sentence on the charge you beat in a retrial would also be vacated, so the overall mitimus (summary of the criminal judgment entered in your case) would always be amended, but it wouldn't necessarily be a full new sentencing hearing.

If so, would the Judge/Jury still be allowed to consider the alleged conduct that was considered way back in the first trial (that you beat way back then)?

Yes, but subject to the limitation that the appeal can't make your original sentence on the charge of reconviction worse.

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