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How do Estate, Interest, Right, Title differ from each other? Below, these different textbooks' glossaries fail to disambiguate them. Even worse, their definitions are circular! Estate is defined in terms of Interest. Interest and Title are defined with Right, but nobody defined Right!

Term Definition Bibliography
Estate An interest in land that allows the interest holder rights of use and possession of that land for a particular duration. Bevan, page 631
the length of time for which land has been granted to a tenant under the system of tenure. It means the duration of the grant. Note that this is a use of the word ‘estate’ that differs from the general use of the word; estate is used in this technical sense in land law. Clarke, 484
This is used in one of three ways. First it can mean the legal extent of person’s ownership rights in land. Secondly it can refer to the physical size of the land. Thirdly it can mean the entire property left by a person on death. The former category comprises either freehold or leasehold estates. Freehold estates are either a fee simple, a fee tail or a life estate. The context normally makes clear in what sense this word is used. Layard, 543
An interest in land which entitles its owner to exercise proprietary rights over that land for a prescribed period. Nair, 622.
Interest under a trust Relationship between trustee (legal owner) and beneficiary (equitable owner) whereby the legal owner has to act for the benefit of the equitable owner, and the equitable owner has a right in the property which can be enforced against third parties. Lees, 232
Interest under a trust of land A right relating to the freehold or leasehold estate which consists in the ability to hold the legal owner of the estate to account for the manner in which he manages his right, and which is itself a proprietary interest. Lees, 23
Title Title describes the right to an estate, to ownership of land and serves as proof of that right Bevan, 633
The evidence of a person’s ownership of land, or the right itself. Layard, 545
A person’s right to property, or the evidence of that right. Nair, 628
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    There are a finite number of words in English, so if you follow any chain of definitions for long enough, necessarily you will eventually either encounter an undefined term or a cycle. At some point you have to rely on general knowledge. Commented Mar 31 at 22:26
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    It is never wise to seek definitions for terms in the abstract in a common law country. Many legal terms have multiple meanings that are context specific. Legal terms don't have universal meanings in all contexts in common law countries. You have no shortage of definitions but without a specific context in which you seek to use them you can't know which makes the most sense.
    – ohwilleke
    Commented Apr 1 at 15:54

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The Black's Law dictionary definition of the word "right" in my hard copy hardback version extends to one and a quarter pages of fairly small print. Some key pertinent excerpts are as follows:

The sense invoked here is as a noun in the concrete sense, in which it means "A power, privilege, faculty, or demand, inherent in one person and incident upon another. . . . a capacity residing in one man of controlling, with the assent and assistance of the state, the actions of others." . . . In a narrower signification, an interest or title in an object or property; a just legal claim to hold, use, or enjoy it, or to convey or donate it, as he may please. A legally enforceable claim of one person against another, that the other shall do a given act, or shall not do a given act.

The question has no shortage of definitions of the other terms.

However, it is never wise to seek definitions for terms in the abstract in a common law country. Many legal terms have multiple meanings that are context specific. Legal terms don't have universal meanings in all contexts in common law countries. You have no shortage of definitions but without a specific context in which you seek to use them you can't know which makes the most sense.

The real question should be "when the words are used in some context, what are you confused about?"

If there is something you are confused about when the terms are applied in a particular way, that can be cleared up, if you ask a question that clarifies your confusion in a particular situation.

If there is no context in which you are confused about what the terms mean, then you don't need any more definitions, and you are just playing games.

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