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I make wood cut and laser engraved maps of cities/towns/locations. Can I use the name of a University on the map. No logos, just the name of the University and its longitude and latitude. Thanks

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A mere name cannot be protected by copyright. Copyright also does not protect mere facts, such as the location of places. See, e.g., Feist Publications, Inc. v. Rural Telephone Service Company, Inc., 499 US 340 (1991). So, the item in the question would not be barred by copyright law.

A university name might be trademarked, but a trademark only protects the trademark holder from using the trademark in a way that gives a consumer the impression that the mark is being used to sell the goods or services of the trademark holder with the authorization of the trademark holder. So, generally speaking, trademark protections should not bar the sale of woodcuts showing the university name and location, because universities are in the business of selling education, not decorative woodcuts.

There are no other intellectual property laws which would plausibly interfere with selling these items.

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    Famous mark trademarks, such as MIT and Harvard would have a much broader scope and might register for a few groups of merchandise
    – Trish
    Jan 31 at 11:13
  • @Trish Perhaps. But I would think that the nominative use argument is still pretty strong.
    – ohwilleke
    Jan 31 at 19:29
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    True... putting the university on the map might go nominative, but using their logo might better inquire for a license.
    – Trish
    Jan 31 at 20:26
  • @Trish Agreed. But the OP says, no logos, just a name and a latitude and longitude.
    – ohwilleke
    Jan 31 at 20:31

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