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Given that cash can be seized without the individual being charged criminally on the basis that the money is somehow guilty: i.e. it has been used in crime, does providing the LE officer with a bank receipt for the money refute "that the money is guilty" and shield said cash from civil forfeiture?

Maybe best to travel with plastic & without cash.

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Does providing the LE officer with bank receipt for the money refute "that the money is not guilty" and shield said cash from civil forfeiture?

It is one piece of evidence that could help prove the case in a timely filed dispute of the civil forfeiture, but it is hardly foolproof.

Maybe best to travel with plastic & without cash.

This is one solution. Traveling with large quantities of cash poses all sorts of risks. For example, it also isn't generally insurable if it is lost or stolen.

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Probably not, no.

Consider this:

  • Deposit $5,000 cash into the bank. Said cash was obtained via some illegal means.
  • Withdraw $5,000 cash from the bank. You now have a receipt from the bank for this withdrawal.

That receipt says nothing about where that money came from originally and how it came to be in your account.

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No. Especially considering that the value in the bank account itself is a viable target for a civil forfeiture order. The Civil Forfeiture Act defines "property" to include intangible personal property.

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