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Results tagged with Search options user 12917

For questions concerning the ownership of ideas, designs and creative work. Specific IP tags include copyright, trademark, and patents.

1
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There is a difference between "idea" and "invention". Only an invention is subject to being patented, thus becoming an enforceable property right. Disclosing ideas, without restrictions, can quickly m …
answered Sep 21 '17 by Upnorth
1
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Yes, unless your acquisition of the device was under a license containing restrictions on your use, such as non-disclosure, or reverse engineering, your publication of schematics would not necessarily …
answered Sep 8 '17 by Upnorth
0
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Claiming registration for "downloadable software" in class 009 would be rejected as an unacceptable description of the goods (i.e., indefinite or overly broad). At last check, there were well over 20 …
answered Sep 4 by Upnorth
0
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The cladding manufacturers readily admit that the materials are unfit for use on buildings over 35 feet high, easily putting the blame elsewhere. As for "intellectual property rights", that could incl …
answered Aug 4 '17 by Upnorth
1
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Registration of copyright is not required until you intend to sue someone in US federal court. The legal author automatically owns the copyright from the moment the work is created in a "tangible form …
answered Jul 29 '17 by Upnorth
0
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The primary question for infringement is whether it creates a "likelihood of confusion" among the consumers. As a general rule, the phonetic equivalent is deemed to be "the same brand". In fact, even …
answered Sep 4 by Upnorth
4
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Your photos of their copyrighted sculpture would constitute "derivative works" or "copies" of their sculpture in a different form, thus infringing the copyright, absent a statutory exemption or a lice …
answered Sep 1 '17 by Upnorth
0
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The owners of a trademark may enforce its inherent rights in state or federal courts from the moment they have used it as a distinctive brand on goods or services in commerce. Registration in the USA …
answered Aug 8 '17 by Upnorth