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The right to communicate without fear of government sanction or censorship. While this right is implied in some countries, it may not be explicit in all of them. For the U.S. see also "first-amendment" tag.

2
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There is, of course, no way to tell how the Court would deal with such a case today. This is not a frequently litigated issue, with lots of case law. I note that in the case you link to, the court lim …
answered Oct 31 '18 by David Siegel
5
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The full text of the Virginia law can be found at https://law.lis.virginia.gov/vacode/title18.2/chapter9/section18.2-422/ Ther are more or less similar laws in several other states. The Virginia law …
answered Feb 5 by David Siegel
2
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First of all, in the US, or more exactly, in many US states, Gender and sexual orientation are protected categories, while political belief is usually not. Moreover, gender at least is something that …
answered Dec 23 '18 by David Siegel
6
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Sometimes In general, intentionally false speech gets less protection than other speech, and in some cases it is unprotected. The classic example of speech that is unprotected is "Falsely shouting FI …
answered Feb 26 by David Siegel
4
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A US state's constitution cannot "put restrictions on" the Federal constitution, or any of the rights guaranteed by it, if by that is meant limiting the rights Federally guaranteed. The so called "Sup …
answered Feb 26 by David Siegel