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For questions about permission and terms to use intellectual property.

1
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If you create something with someone else's software, what you've created is yours. The only exception would be if the software tool in question embedded a significant amount of its own code or data …
answered Oct 1 '18 by David Thornley
1
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Looking at the license entry at Creative Commons, we see that the -ND means that "NoDerivatives — If you remix, transform, or build upon the material, you may not distribute the modified material." T …
answered Sep 5 '18 by David Thornley
0
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If the Programs means the software you bought, then you can keep the licenses separate. You use the LGPL software as a shared library under the LGPL. Provide the source code under the rules of the L …
answered Jan 23 by David Thornley
2
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First, as this is a commercial enterprise, you'd do best to talk to a lawyer to make sure what you are planning to do is legal. From the brief description, it sounds like your worry is copyright issu …
answered Oct 24 '18 by David Thornley
3
votes
The copyright holder is free to release the work under whatever licenses the copyright holder wants, in the absence of a contract saying otherwise. A copyright holder could sign a contract not to rel …
answered Oct 23 '18 by David Thornley
1
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Checking Cornell on copyright law, the reserved rights include public performance and public display. If you have a DVD legitimately, you still can't display or show publicly without a license. So, …
answered Aug 10 '18 by David Thornley
1
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Companies who try to avoid software copyright infringement use a "clean-room" method. In one "room", people dig into the code of whatever is being copied and write up detailed specs. In another "roo …
answered Dec 14 '18 by David Thornley
2
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All app code and resources are copyrighted. Without some sort of license, nobody else can legally copy any part of it. The lack of an EULA or license means that copyright law governs what you can do …
answered Oct 1 '18 by David Thornley
9
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Whether this is considered a trade secret (at least in the US) depends partly on whether you've taken reasonable action to keep it secret. If an employee thought it was OK to publish the algorithm, t …
answered Nov 8 '18 by David Thornley
1
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We can't answer that question here. We can make some observations. First, the Unlicense is applied to software that's basically free for anyone to do anything with. It's basically making the softwar …
answered Feb 12 by David Thornley
2
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Most products can be used for illegal purposes, so just selling something that is used for illegal activities can't incur such liability in general. There are exceptions, of course. If a product is …
answered Jan 8 by David Thornley
1
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If it's your code (and you're not using someone else's released under a GPL version), you can release it as you like under what terms you like under whatever licenses you like. There are no restricti …
answered Feb 18 by David Thornley