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Results tagged with Search options answers only user 9445

For questions specific to the United Kingdom. Note that the UK does not have a common legal system across its jurisdictions - consider using [scotland] or [england-and-wales] or [northern-ireland].

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I'm assuming that you are locking him inside the house with a responsible adult, rather than locking him in his room alone for a long period of time. The latter would probably be considered neglect or …
answered Sep 5 by Paul Johnson
2
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It sounds like you need to take the landlord to court. Make sure you are suing the right person; look at your rental contract to see who you the other party was and name them on the court documents. A …
answered Dec 7 '18 by Paul Johnson
2
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In general if you receive a letter about something then a court is going to deem that you have been notified, so you can't just declare to the DVLA or anyone else that letters to you have no effect. I …
answered Dec 31 '18 by Paul Johnson
2
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Although the local mechanic was suggested by you he was paid by the dealer, and hence was acting as the dealer's agent in the repair. If the dealer did not want to accept this then they could have sim …
answered Jan 3 by Paul Johnson
30
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Yes, that would be fraud. From the Fraud Act 2006: 2: Fraud by false representation 1) A person is in breach of this section if he— (a) dishonestly makes a false representation, and …
answered Apr 29 by Paul Johnson
1
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Obviously you should start by sending an invoice for the 1 month that you believe you are owed. Hopefully they will just pay it. If they don't then write a letter ending with something along the lines …
answered Jun 2 by Paul Johnson
1
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If you are selling "low voltage" (meaning under 1000 volts) equipment across an EU border then it requires CE marking. It sounds like your products qualify. If you merely resell equipment that someon …
answered Nov 7 '18 by Paul Johnson
1
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I believe you can, but you are likely to have to travel to the UK if a hearing is needed. The EU system is designed to work from documents where possible and hence not need a hearing.
answered Jun 4 by Paul Johnson
0
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You can hire a loss assessor yourself (an "adjuster" works for an insurance company, an "assessor" works for you). These people should (I believe) be able to give you an answer that the court will acc …
answered Mar 2 by Paul Johnson
0
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For anywhere in the EU you need "CE marking". This describes the standards you have to meet. (Strictly speaking, only if you sell outside the UK, but in practice there isn't a lot of difference). Whi …
answered Jan 6 by Paul Johnson
1
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The GDPR requires the Data Controller (i.e. your company) to put in place appropriate measures for accountability. These will include appointing a Data Protection Officer (DPO) and implementing police …
answered Aug 27 by Paul Johnson
1
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(I'm using the word "you" in this reply to avoid convoluted grammar). It is not fraud to send yourself an email because you haven't deceived anyone. The scenario you describe would probably be a viol …
answered Dec 12 '18 by Paul Johnson