93

There is a general belief that a term being trademarked means that it's illegal to use the term without permission from the trademark holder, but that is false. It is illegal only if it is done in a manner that suggests endorsement by the trademark holder. For instance, selling a football as a "Super Bowl football" would be trademark infringement, as it ...


36

Is that extortion? false advertising? or in any way illegal? Not at all. The owner of the site is simply exercising his right as outlined in the terms and conditions from when the user signed up. And giving users an option for continued use of the site (that is, for him not to exercise a right of which they were always aware) does not constitute extortion.


18

This is perfectly fine, unless you have a contract which states that they must continue to provide free service until a certain date. If anything, they're doing the right thing by notifying you that things will change so that you can make other arrangements if needed. If they started charging you $20/mo. without your agreement, that would be illegal.


10

Extortion is a threat to do something unlawful While threats to do something that's harmful for you are a key component of extortion, those threats generally (there are additional, separate provisions for threatening to exposing secrets etc) need to be unlawful . For example, if I haven't paid the bills for some service and they send a letter "pay up or we'...


8

This actually happens all the time and isn't considered extortion. Essentially, this is nothing more or less than a free service getting monetized after a while. This happens many times per year. For example, earlier this year the Have I been Pwned API has switched from free to paid because of the large amount of abuse: https://www.troyhunt.com/...


4

How Are Liability And Insurance Matters Usually Disclosed? Normally, in a car sharing arrangement, you must establish a membership or account with the car sharing firm that includes all of the terms and conditions of the agreement between the parties (at least by reference to a document that you acknowledge that you have had an opportunity to read), often ...


4

Under U.S. law, this is only actionable is you make this statement knowing that it would not "support the continued creation of X" and that instead, you had already completely abandoned that product and you were, for example, planning to change lines of work and become a lumberjack instead. Even in that case, common law fraud is hard to show, because you ...


2

That is entirely lawful. The law only sanctions advertisements that are deliberately deceptive, such as the practices listed in this statute. One of the prima facie elements of fraud, unjust enrichment, or related torts, is that your representation of working on game X be knowingly false (which you mention it is not). Most important, the circumstances may ...


2

I am assuming that they are asking about whether or not they can be sued for saying that the books "contain 100% questions" even though maybe only 90% of the questions of the real exams were included. The answer is that you can, in theory, be sued for anything, but not necessarily successfully. The people most likely to sue you would be people that ...


1

misleading plaintiff's customers that appointments from now on must be scheduled with defendant (and not plaintiff's general manager) - would that qualify as disparagement? Only if the legal definition is taken literally, since the legal definition of "disparagement" is too broad and ambiguous. Thus, the legal theory(-ies) at issue should be made more ...


1

It depends which law applies Contract law A contract is interpreted under someone’s law. For a competent internet company the contract will usually specify which law applies, if not, the court must decide where the contract was entered into - this may be where you are or where they are. While clauses allowing unilateral changes are legal, the power must ...


1

No I assume you are concerned about this? Restraints on deceptive and misleading conduct, where they exist, are almost always limited to conduct in trade or commerce (such as advertising) - otherwise its an unreasonable infringement of freedom of speech.


1

how should I proceed next? Try persuading the hypnotherapist to give you a refund. Prevailing against the hypnotherapist in court seems to be a long shot and not worth the attempt. And paying an attorney to tell you this --most likely with lesser detail and not even pointing you to sources of law-- will only add to your losses. One of the prima facie ...


1

YES You are not re-selling the screens, just using them in an advertising display.


1

As well as the accepted answer, don't forget that the reason your drive is reporting free space below the capacity, is dependent on what disk format you have used (or was done for you). Even a basic boot sector, partition map and root directory may take away hundreds of MB on a sufficiently large capacity drive. There will be a difference in the 'free' ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible