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Not yet – in the US. There is no such thing as an "agreed-upon colloquial definition" of any term (we elect presidents, not definitions), so the existence of an ordinary meaning of every word is subject to debate pro and con. Typically, if the meaning of a word is at issue and the law has not stipulated a specific meaning in some case, the courts ...


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No A reasonable person understands “chemical free” to mean free of artificial (i.e. man-made) chemicals.


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australia The standard is: is it misleading or deceptive? The prohibition on misleading and deceptive conduct in trade or commerce comes from the Australian Consumer Law and applies to all aspects of business, not just advertising. Your “gut” is pretty much on point - if the extra item is normally an expected part of the base product then offering it as free ...


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