40

The 4th amendment is irrelevant because you consented to being searched as a condition of passing through security - you don’t have to fly. You cannot revoke that consent once x-ray screening or metal detection has commenced i.e. once your bags are checked, your hand luggage is in the scanner or you have entered the metal detector. The relevant issue is ...


22

Your rights1 in a country depend on that country's laws with respect to aliens (foreigners). While you may expect some standards where countries have obligations under international law, a sovereign state is free to legislate with respect to aliens as it wishes. The short answer? You don't have British rights when you travel abroad, and the same is true ...


12

There are rights and duties that you have as a British Citizen. You keep these rights wherever you go. These rights say for example how British Police has to treat you, but if you are say in Germany, you are unlikely to meet British Police, so these rights are not very helpful abroad. You have certain rights as a EU citizen. These rights will be useful to ...


10

You have it backwards. The duty is yours, not to book connections that are too tight. (Or the airline if they book the itinerary). If you book a connection so tight that you have to be OJ Simpson (back when he was famous for running through airports), TSA is not obliged to help you pull that off. In fact, think about it. If I was a terrorist trying to ...


8

The fourth amendment does not apply to TSA searches. Passengers consent to the search as a condition of being allowed to enter the secure area of the airport and to board the plane. A search done with consent does not violate the fourth amendment. I do not know whether you have some other cause of action here, but whatever it may be, it does not involve ...


7

Searching someone based solely on their name is obviously illegal as per the 4th amendment...I need to transfer flights along this journey at airport B. Airport B decided to do an advanced search [presumably because of your name], causing me to miss my flight to airport C since the advanced search had taken too much time. Is this a breach of the ...


7

Do flight attendants have an unlimited leeway of forcing the passengers to listen to their gibberish that are completely unrelated to their duties? Pretty much, I'd say. It may not be a good customer experience, but the flight attendant certainly isn't doing anything illegal. You don't have a legal right not to hear speeches that offend your IP ...


4

Turkish airlines states its cancellation policies here – this is what appears to a person in the US, content in Nepal or elsewhere is anyone's guess. The possibility and cost of cancellation depends on whether the ticket is domestic or international, and what the fare class is. For example no cancellation with refund is possible under the international ...


4

You would need to read your contract A few points to note: International air tickets are subject to the law at the port of origin irrespective of the number of flights. So if your return flight starts in Paris it will be under French law, if it starts in Kathmandu it will be under Nepalese law. Your nationality is almost certainly irrelevant. If the ...


3

Any compensation would be under the guise of EU regulation EC No 261/2004. Under the assumption that they claim the cancellation is due to Extraordinary Circumstances, then "compensation is not due if the carrier can prove that the cancellation is caused by extraordinary circumstances which could not have been avoided even if all reasonable measures had been ...


3

A charge of Theft by Finding is unlikely to succeed, as by posting details of found property on the website Heathrow Airport have made a good faith attempt to find the owner. There might be some comedy value in suggesting Blackmail, but not much more than that. (You knew that one was tenuous.) There appear to be some grounds for arguing the "control" ...


3

No. This is not gambling. Your quoted and paraphrased definition is especially misleading, since the original definition given on uslegal.com explicitly excepts bona fide business transactions valid under the law of contracts, such as the purchase or sale at a future date of securities or commodities, contracts of indemnity or guaranty and life, health or ...


3

The newly-reinstated presidential proclamation says (Sec 3(b)) says The suspension of entry pursuant to section 2 of this proclamation shall not apply to: (i) any lawful permanent resident of the United States; The State department also lists exceptions to the travel ban on 8 countries, identifying those who "will not be subject to any travel ...


3

While the circumstances you describe do not mean your friend lost any of his British rights (which only apply to interactions with the British government), it is true that being outside of the UK a British subject does lose some protections. For example, recently the UK assassinated three British subjects who were allegedly part of IS, on the grounds that ...


2

There are ways that you can give up your UK citizenship; travelling to a foreign country is not one of them. While traveling you retain all your rights and obligations as a UK citizen - this includes the right to be detained and charged in accordance with the laws of the country through which you are travelling (unless you are an accredited diplomat). This ...


2

You may have gotten rights and privileges mixed up. You don't have rights, as a British subject (you're subjects, right, not citizens?) in a foreign country. But it used to be that you had a privilege: That being a British subject would enable, even cause, the British government to use its influence - or even enforce its influence with military might - ...


2

Intentional sabotage of a TSA computer system is almost certainly a serious crime and would also almost surely give rise to civil liability, although you might avoid both if you warned the TSA that the phone was set up to intentionally break their system, in which case it might be confiscated as contraband. If the product had a "feature" unknown to you and ...


2

A property owner can give you an easement for the air rights of their property, which can allow you to put your own structure over their property or prevent them from putting a structure over their property (depending on the terms of the easement). For instance, a railroad might sell the air rights to an urban rail yard to a private developer so that the ...


2

In most countries, one possible and completely legal action when you find what you think is lost property, is to completely ignore it. From that point of view, they don't have to do anything. And if lost property blocks passengers, and is a possible security risk, they would be allowed to move it where it's not in the way and where it is no danger. They ...


2

Yes The airline is entitled to recover what the passenger cost it - that’s how damages work. If it’s successful in its legal pursuit of the passenger it’s also entitled to legal costs (generally, legal costs are complicated). This can either be the actual amount or a genuine pre-estimate of that amount in the contract, called a liquidated damages amount. ...


2

Probably No. To the extent that the airline is enforcing immigrations laws, it is likely doing so at the direction of a government official or government regulations, or sometimes as an actual agent of the government. Essentially, in the first instance, the airline would have an illegality defense to a claim for breach of contract. An airline can't be ...


2

The question is not if the airline is wrong, the question is if they are negligent If the airline has a reasonable belief that the trip is unlawful then they are within their legal obligations to stop Bob boarding. In arriving at their belief, providing they acted within the law and their own policies and made reasonable enquires within the time ...


2

Short answer, No. In the United State, all aircraft (even of other countries) may not have gambling devices onboard under title 49 SS 41311 An air carrier or foreign air carrier may not install, transport, or operate, or permit the use of, any gambling device onboard an aircraft In Russia, gambling was banned in almost every part of Russia in 2009 ...


1

Your .eu link says, If you were denied boarding, your flight was cancelled, you experienced a delay of more than 2 hours at departure or you arrive with a long delay at your final destination, the airline must give you a written notice setting out the rules for compensation and assistance. My understanding regarding each of those 4 issues is that: (You ...


1

The main anti-cartel legislation present in the UK is taken from article 101 TFEU. Essentially, companies are forbidden to enter "undertakings" or a "concerted practice" which would have the effect of disrupting competition in the internal market, this includes: The issue for many companies here is that the words undertaking and concerted practice have a ...


1

In many countries, national anti-trust or competition law makes agreements between competitors, including international competitors, on pricing or other agreements considered to be anti-competitive, such as agreements to allocate market areas, illegal. The exact scope and provisions vary by country. Generally a company is bound by the law of its home country....


1

As in most cases it depends on the details. The length of a blade (> 44mm and width > 10) is important and the circumstances. Assume a fine to something up to € 10000, but a sentence up to 3 years is also possible. In Germany it is not crime (anything that can be fined or minimal sentence is less than 1 year is not a crime). I assume that they took ...


1

As noted in the other answer, the statement is indeed partially true. It is also misleading by virtue of being oversimplified. I don't suppose that advertising is particularly relevant here, but the directive you link to does contain explicit provisions about the notification of air passengers by air carriers, in Article 14. This says nothing about ...


1

This might provide a helpful general guide. The first question is whether the regulation is applicable: it is, if you are departing from an EU state (France), or traveling to an EU state on an EU-based airline (so not a Air Madagascar flight from Madagascar). There are factors such as not having a confirmed reservation or arriving late, or free / discounted ...


1

Your visa status will not prevent you from staying in a hotel. A visa of this type lasts for 29 days, and no one expects that someone who is permitted to stay in the U.S. while in transit for up to 29 days needs to sleep in the bus station or in a tent in a park. Furthermore, lodging places in the U.S. do not generally evaluate the immigration status of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible