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88

It is legal, at least in the US, for a store (or other entity) to refuse to sell any item to any individual for any non-prohibited reason (prohibited reasons are typically things like race or religion). More over, in various US jurisdictions, it is prohibited to "furnish" alcohol to a "minor" (for example, under California's ABC law), which can be ...


45

You go into a store, pick up an item, go to the counter and you think you are legally entitled to own the item provided that you pay for it? Wrong. Wrong for any item, not just alcohol. Items that are on the shelves in stores are not offers in terms of contract law. They are invitations to treat/bargain. When you take an item to the counter it is you who ...


20

The answers here are already correct, but wanted to make a quick comment over this Even when I left the store to wait in the car they made him check out at a different register. It is of course completely silly that this is required, but from what I was told when I worked at a liquor store this was needed. The idea is by checking out at a different ...


9

According to German law (Jugendschutzgesetz), §9: Minors 14 years of age and older may drink undistilled alcoholic beverages, such as wine and beer, when accompanied by a Custodial Person, Minors 16 years of age and older may drink undistilled alcoholic beverages, such as wine and beer, without accompaniment, and Adults (18 and older) may drink distilled ...


7

Is there anything I can do so that the authorities investigate and revoke his privilege of driving a car? Yes. Next time he drinks and gets behind the wheel, call the police and tell them that you are witnessing an intoxicated person about to drive. If the police witness him behind the wheel while intoxicated, he'll be issued a DUI, perhaps face jail time, ...


7

It is illegal to sell alcohol to a minor in Washington (RCW 66.44.270). The seller can get into various kinds of trouble, including losing their license, under liquor board regulations. However, as long as the establishment follows the rules for acceptable ID, they escape liability if in fact they sell alcohol to a minor: the license holder is legally ...


6

Well, moral obligations are not laws, nor sometimes even moral obligations. Some laws are based on what some courts and legislatures think are moral obligations. We think cannibals have a moral obligation not to eat people; cannibals think non-cannibals are fools for passing up a good BBQ. As for a leader's moral responsibility for millions of lives, we can ...


6

This would probably not be a drunk driving offense. Under the UK "drunk in charge of a motor vehicle" law: How is “in charge” defined? There is no definition of “in charge” and the courts have been keen to avoid an all-embracing test. In determining if a person is in charge the court will consider: Whether he was in the vehicle, if so ...


5

Firstly, this is actually a really good question - The Australian Constitution grants few explicit protections or rights to people, and it does not protect you from discrimination on the basis of age. In any case, you'll find that it is not a violation of the Age Discrimination Act 2004 (Cth) - see s39. This makes an exemption, amongst others, to the Act ...


5

With respect to many questions of law minors are not people. Human rights vest as people age: there are any number of variations by jurisdiction, but you will see the following (often constitutional) rights granted at different ages: To own property To enter into contracts To work for pay To decline an education To consent to medical treatment To be secure ...


4

There is no legal theory of which I'm aware which would allow a host to confiscate a guest's property without consent and consideration. Even if the host intends to return the property and both parties know this, the host still can't keep it even temporarily after the owner demands its return. File a police report, press charges and sue for damages. Take ...


3

The police can arrest and charge anyone if they have a reasonable belief that a crime has been committed so: yes. However, if the question is: can they secure a conviction the answer is a resounding no. North Carolina law has three prohibitions on minors and alcohol: supplying to, possession of and buying. Possession is easily dealt with: the minor never ...


3

Arizona law operates in terms of "spirituous liquor", which is defined as containing more than 0.5% alcohol by volume. You'd have to send the cheese to a lab to determine the actual alcohol content, but it is likely that the product has less than the threshold amount of alcohol. It is not clear why vanilla extract is not classified as a spirituous liquor, ...


3

Indiana's open container law is in Section 9-30-15-3 (b) of the Indiana Code. (b) A person in a motor vehicle who, while the motor vehicle is in operation or while the motor vehicle is located on the right-of-way of a public highway, possesses a container: (1) that has been opened; (2) that has a broken seal;  or (3) from which some of ...


3

It is quite likely that a constitutional amendment was (and is) not needed to ban alcohol. For example, if the Controlled Substances Act is constitutional (and I have no reason to believe it isn't) then alcohol could be added to it tomorrow and it could be removed the day after tomorrow. Right there is the reason that you choose to use a constitutional ...


3

Wikipedia says: Open containers in vehicles Prohibition of Open Containers of Alcohol in Motor Vehicles as of 2009 To comply with the TEA-21 rules of the federal Department of Transportation, a state's motor vehicle open container laws must: Prohibit both possession of any open alcoholic beverage container and consumption of any alcoholic ...


3

I think this relates to individual stores interpretation of California's "ABC Laws": § 25658. Sale to and consumption by person under 21 years of age; Use by peace officers to apprehend sellers of alcoholic beverages to minors (a) Except as otherwise provided in subdivision (c), every person who sells, furnishes, gives, or causes to be sold,...


3

The criteria for refusing service in California is the patron being “obviously drunk”. 5 150ml mimosas is not a lot, even in an hour - it has approximately the same alcohol content as 2 425ml beers. I certainly wouldn’t be “obviously drunk” after that. Only 18 year olds and over can serve or act as bartenders for on-premises consumption. Whether someone ...


2

They need only take " reasonable measures", which is fairly subjective sounding... I know... But it just means that it's a fact dependent analysis taking into consideration all of the facts that are readily available. So, for example, it would be a different burden if you had 10,000 people coming, vs 10. If you post a sign saying no alcohol allowed on ...


2

As far as I know it isn't illegal in the UK to have under 18s ACT drinking alcoholic drinks, ensuring you are giving them non-alcoholic drinks. For most acting, actors will drink a non-alcoholic substance that looks like beer, since we wouldn't want drunk actors. On the 8/6/16 in a Soap known as Coronation Street a 16/17 (I can't remember which) year old ...


2

Generally speaking, I think the answer is no. As my answer will explain, the acts of sale and delivery require a licence, but Prohibition prevents licences from working in the "holdouts." Introduction Liquor in Alberta is governed by the Gaming, Liquor and Cannabis Act (GLCA), whose liquor part starts with this general statement in § 50: No ...


2

The first tax on a domestic product by the U.S. government was on distilled alcohol (1791). Since then, alcohol production and sale has been aggressively regulated by the federal government, ostensibly (if nothing else) to ensure the integrity of this revenue stream. Today, the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) of the U.S. Department of the ...


2

A vending machine of this type was proposed and reported upon by the BBC this summer. It isn't clear if it has actually been approved by sale by English officials in charge of alcohol regulation.


1

As long as you are happy to allow the machine to make the determination then you could allow it to sell alcohol on your licence. It would be no different to, say, scanning an ID card for validation. You are responsible for ensuring that proper checks are made. How those checks are made is up to you, and you are responsible if they fail. A related example ...


1

The Volstead Act was partially repealed by the 74th Congress: "Titles I and II of the National Prohibition Act...are hereby repealed". You can see the relevant law passed in 1935 via these links. Title III of the Volstead Act pertains to industrial alcohol, and was not repealed. Section 2 of the 21st Amendment states: The transportation or importation ...


1

Restrictions on the sale, consumption, and possession of alcoholic beverages do not apply to cheese because cheese is not a beverage.


1

Though the act does not directly address the issue of donating alcohol, it is likely that under section 151 of the Licensing Act 2003 it would be considered an offence to provide (free of charge) alcohol to a minor, considering the purpose of the provision. (1)A person who works on relevant premises in any capacity, whether paid or unpaid, commits an ...


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