New answers tagged

6

What's the reality? There is great diversity in how arbitration proceedings are conducted (as another answer notes, there are also lots of forms of ADR, especially mediation, that don't involve testimony at all). It isn't unusual for testimony that is sworn, or made under penalty of perjury to be used in arbitration, although it is not a universal practice. ...


10

RCW 7.04A.170 states that "An arbitrator may issue a subpoena for the attendance of a witness and for the production of records and other evidence at any hearing and may administer oaths", also "All laws compelling a person under subpoena to testify and all fees for attending a judicial proceeding, a deposition, or a discovery proceeding as a ...


-1

Yes. It is the witness's oath, not the nature of the proceeding, that puts the liar at risk of perjury. So while a lying witness in a criminal trial could face perjury charges, a lying attorney could not. Witnesses in arbitration proceedings are generally placed under oath, basically the same as if they were in court, in a deposition, or signing an affidavit....


7

Because they are private Not private in the sense of confidential, although many are confidential (if agreed by the parties) and the arbitrator is always under a duty of confidence. Rather, private in the sense that they are conducted by private people and organisations who have no obligation to publish or publicise the results. Since most people pay on the ...


Top 50 recent answers are included