4

There aren't bright line rules in the area of fair use (which is the core issue - you are clearly copying a work that has copyright protected portions, at least - the question is whether fair use provides a defense and whether some portions are not copyright protected). This inquiry is fact specific and driven by general standards. Context such as whether ...


3

Admission of copying proves one of the elements that the plaintiffs would normally need to prove in an infringement suit, making a law suit less risky from their perspective. This may very well invite lawsuits that would otherwise not be filed. But, this is pure speculation. Your legal rights are the same, independent of how much you choose to reveal in ...


3

The GPL does require you to keep any existing copyright notices: You may copy and distribute verbatim copies of the Program's source code as you receive it, in any medium, provided that you [...] keep intact all the notices that refer to this License and to the absence of any warranty [...] The GPL also recommends adding a notice to each file: ...


2

Copyright does not contain the right to attribution (except with respect to authors of visual arts at 17 USC 106A). A copyright owner has the exclusive right to reproduce a work, create derivative works, distribute copies, etc. (17 USC §106). As we already answered here, when a copyright owner gives somebody else permission to do some of those things, the ...


2

As far as I can tell, the Oracle Binary Licence Agreement doesn't say much. If you're really concerned, it's better to be safe than sorry. Just add a quick note, this app was written with Java!, but make sure not to make it look as if Oracle endorses/promotes the app. If you're willing to release the source code and binaries, you may like Github. You may ...


2

When you distirbute a Creative Commons licensed work, you must attribute all licencors who authored some component of the work (unless you have been forbidden to do so by some author(s)). Being a downstream recipient does not diminish that responsibility. When a person makes a derivative of a CC-licensed work, the license requires that person to attribute ...


2

Wikipedia text is licensed under the Creative Commons Share-Alike Attribution license, or CC BY-SA for short. Quick note, images aren't always licensed under this license - they can be under more restrictive or permissive licenses that can limit your usage of them. With this Open Source post, there is no required way to do this, however, there are a few ...


2

A watermark would be one acceptable means, but not the only one. If it was on YouTube you could put the attribution in the title of the work. In a presentation, you could make attribution part of the script of the presentation.


1

Yes The licence allows you to request you not be attributed “to the extent reasonable practicable.” It is reasonably practical for you not to be attributed on distributions that have not yet happened.


1

You have to give attribution by the terms of the license. If that is the only way then that is the way you must do it.


1

US jurisdiction doesn't recognize a general right to attribution (it can be a license condition), however, many jurisdictions (EU, UK, Australia etc.) recognize moral rights as separate and independent of copyright which includes attribution rights to the creator (not the copyright owner) among other things.


1

If you follow the CC BY-SA 3.0 license under which Wikipedia articles are licensed: You are allowed to make modifications, because Wikipedia doesn’t use a "no derivatives (ND)" CC license. The license requires (in section 3. b.) to denote that changes were made: […] clearly label, demarcate or otherwise identify that changes were made to the original ...


1

It would help to know what jurisdiction you're in. If you're in the United States, you can register a DBA (Doing business as/Trade name) The fees for registering a DBA vary from state to state, but in general it costs very little (about $50 or less) You can later file the paperwork to convert your DBA to an LLC with the same name, should you so desire.


1

As an example, in Germany the author always has the right to state that he or she is the author. Nobody else has that right. The right cannot be sold or transferred in any way. So yes, if you wrote it, even if you were paid to write it, even if you signed a contract that the company will have the copyright, and even if you signed a contract that the company ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible