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5

I cannot speak for Belgium but in general there are ways to be exempted from jury duty. This is self-evidently the case as there must be ways of excusing people who are, for example, chronically ill or so severely disabled that they cannot function as jurors. I am sure that a quick search on the Belgian court's website will have this all explained. To ...


4

Compliance with acoustic standards does not necessarily mean that you will not hear noise from your neighbors. You have an expert opinion stating that the building complies. It is possible that the expert is wrong - the only way to find out is to have a different expert do their own analysis. This will cost you money and they will either agree with the ...


4

The details depend on jurisdiction, but all jurisdictions I know of will excuse jurors if they are medically unfit for jury duty. So the best option would be to try and obtain a medical/psychological certification that you are not fit for jury duty. Of course this assumes you have someone (such as your psychologist, your psychiatrist or your general ...


3

Not legal advice - you should consult an attorney who knows your local jurisdiction. That's a general statement, but especially true here because the GDPR does not include personal liability for directors (or others) in the event of a data breach, but domestic laws may indeed do just that. The UK is one example where certain circumstances can lead to ...


3

Belgium enacted an implementing law, the Act of 30th July 2018 on the protection of natural persons with regard to the processing of personal data. This, along with the GDPR, are the key legislative references that relate to your question. On 5th September 2017 the ECHR judged that it "considers that States should ensure that, when an employer takes ...


3

There is no real answer to that question at this point. If on filed such a suit, it would probably be under a negligence theory. You would sue: Forbes, because they're the website the user visited? The ad network that provided a vector for infection and didn't properly check their content? The makers of the ad, because they made the ad with ...


2

This is likely a simple case of someone giving them your email address by mistake, instead of their own. In any case, if you didn't make the booking you owe them nothing. You should respond to the email, stating that you didn't make the booking and that you believe they have a case of mistaken identity. Suggest that they send the SMS message, as it is ...


2

The GDPR is no blanket prohibition of data use, it requires a legal basis and/or the consent of the data subject for data processing. Is your company large enough to require a data protection officer? If so, consult this officer. If not, talk to the legal department. Document that, and you should be legally on the safe side if they tell you to go ahead. An ...


2

Ideally, an employer should have a code of conduct or policy that covers workplace monitoring. If a code or policy has been agreed, it will usually form part of your contract of employment. This means that where an employer is allowed to monitor your activities, these activities could be the subject of disciplinary action if you are using workplace equipment ...


1

No It would either be : 100% owned by both of you (the Common Estate regime which is what happens if you don’t have a marital contract), or 100% by you (or whatever is detailed in your marital contract). For 1., being 100% owned by both of you is different from owning 50% each. For example, you can’t sell your “share” to a third party without your spouse’...


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Links in French, sorry, I don't know Dutch/Flemish. Yes, the law allowing you to make the copies in the first place doesn't require maintaining the source. Article XI.190 of the Code de droit économique: Lorsque l'oeuvre a été licitement divulguée, l'auteur ne peut interdire : [...] 9° la reproduction d'oeuvres, à l'exception des partitions ...


1

Ignorantia juris non excusat What do you mean you "didn't know"? Its your duty to inform yourself of all the laws that apply to you at all times and in all jurisdictions. While this is a practical absurdity, it is fundamental to the rule of law - otherwise people could get away with murder because they "didn't know" killing people was illegal. ...


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It's not a retroactive law. It doesn't change the legality of any action in the past. It is a law that affects items that were in previously signed contracts, but that's not new. For example, changes in employment law can change or invalidate some provisions in work agreements and contracts. In the US, agreements that an employee's total creative ...


1

Because Belgium is a sovereign nation and (presumably) is not prohibited constitutionally from making retroactive laws in general and this one in particular. The foreign publishers have just fallen victim to sovereign risk - the risk that a change of law or government policy will adversely affect your rights under a contract. Governments are wary of ...


1

I'm acually not familiar with the situation in Belgium (I live in Germany), but what kind of trouble do you expect? Your landlord charging you for the damages? Once you move out, you have no interest in how the damages are handled. Your goal is ending the rental in a smooth way without losing energy or money in the process. Sounds like you relationship to ...


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