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2

"...what reasoning would the court use to evaluate the competing claims?" I'm assuming civil court, because even though you say Bella is on probation, you haven't indicated a prosecutor and/or criminal court is involved. In civil court, evidentiary rules are different than criminal; some past history might be inadmissible. And there are only six jurors ...


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what reasoning would the court use to evaluate the competing claims? Absent a verifiable contract, the dispute would require assessment of the extrinsic evidence and/or of other aspects reflecting the parties' credibility. Those types of factors would help for discerning whose position is meritorious. You are right in that Bella's co-signing of the loan is ...


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B sues A Under your scenario, the Client is a Principal and A is a Contractor under a Contract and A is the Principal and B is a (Sub)Contractor under a different (Sub)Contract. Assuming that B has fulfilled all its obligations under the Subcontract with A then A owes them the agreed payment and B sues A for the liquidated debt if they don't pay. Whether A ...


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100% legal The foreign individual can choose to acquiesce to the demand or be sued. If they are sued they can chose to defend the suit (e.g. by hiring a local lawyer or attending in person) or not defend it (if so, they will probably lose). If they lose the US judgement will be applied by the Indian courts and Indian assets can be seized to satisfy it. ...


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I just wanted to start working to make a living, so didn't pay heed to it any further. You seem to have made the mistake of signing a contract, but not taking the obligations of the contract seriously. In both the US and India a contract is a binding obligation. Of course the laws about what is required and what is forbidden to include in a contract and ...


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