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Not owning the game copyright is a key fact, but not the only relevant fact needed to come up with an accurate answer. There may or may not be a license or implied license to use the material, or the use may be "fair use". Using sharing something derived from a game to which you do not own a copyright is on its face a copyright violation. So, unless you fall ...


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misleading plaintiff's customers that appointments from now on must be scheduled with defendant (and not plaintiff's general manager) - would that qualify as disparagement? Only if the legal definition is taken literally, since the legal definition of "disparagement" is too broad and ambiguous. Thus, the legal theory(-ies) at issue should be made more ...


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No, you cannot do that based just on the EULA. You need to talk to the product owners and make a deal. The Product may be incorporated into, and may incorporate itself, into software and other technology owned or controlled by third parties. Although the EULA mentions third parties, it is focused on what end users (the "second" parties) can do with the ...


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It is tax fraud And breach of employment law If you are working for a company you don’t own, that company must pay you the minimum wage for your work and that must be taxed. Any profits the company makes also need to be taxed, either in the USA or where the company is domiciled. If there is no tax treaty between the USA and that country it will need to pay ...


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Gambling involves wagering something of value Cash is "something of value" but it's not the only thing that has value. Things of value do not have to be convertible to cash to have value. Your website credits are something of value - they cost money to purchase and they can be converted to other things, even if those things are virtual. This is gambling. ...


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Some of the main liabilities that can't be waived are liabilities arising from intentional torts, reckless conduct, willful and wanton conduct, gross negligence and bad faith. Also, often certain statutory liabilities (e.g. an obligation to pay minimum wage to employees governed by an agreement) provide on their face that they may not be waived by agreement. ...


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A receipt is just a written proof that money was taken. It is hard to imagine a place on Earth where the legality of giving such a proof would be questionable at all so that you would need to talk about an "authority to issue receipts". Only if you find a place where money itself is illegal. Now, the real question here is whether such receipts (issued by ...


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