New answers tagged

0

To the best of my knowledge, there is no legal requirement that an advertisement include contact info for the firm whose goods are being promoted. Certainly such a requirement is not present in all possible jurisdictions. If the publication is concerned that the offered composition (text plus any images) would look like an editorial endorsement, they could ...


2

It would seem to me that a company with which you are doing business has a legitimate reason to confirm that you did or did not receive their messages, just as they would be entitled to send you postal mail with a return receipt if they choose to. They already know the contents of the email, because they are either the sender or the receiver, so the only ...


0

I'll give you some examples: You buy a coffee machine, or a waffle iron. They say "not for business use". Now if you are a sole trader who occassionaly drinks a coffee, that's one thing. But if you make a living selling coffee to the public, that cheap coffee machine you bought isn't built for that use. So you will be refused warranty repairs or ...


1

You need to ask what constitutes "business use". For example, to take an extreme case, if I regularly bring home files from work, and sit in the living room doing them before supper, and now and then text my employer to ask the email address to send it to, does that mean I'm using my living room for "business use"? Or if I'm a teacher and ...


3

Have you ever bought groceries? If you have, I’m pretty sure you never signed a contract nor asked the person on the till if they had the authority to enter a contract on behalf of the company. Notwithstanding, a contract is what you had with the grocery company; one that is legally binding on both you and that company. (Most) contracts don’t need to be ...


2

A company is bound by the actions of anyone who has "apparent authority" to act on its behalf. If they didn't have actual authority to do so, the company can potentially sue the person or otherwise punish them (e.g. by firing them) for overstepping their bounds. Any limitations placed on someone's authority is only effective to the extent it is ...


3

The game Five Nights at Freddy's and the other elements in the large media franchise of the same name are surely protected by copyright. In addition the name of the fictional restaurant in the game may well be protected as a trademark, and I would be astounded if "Five Nights at Freddy's" was not protected as a trademark. Other names and phrases ...


Top 50 recent answers are included