5

No California has no laws on social gambling so it is treated identically to commercial gambling. Since betting on outcomes other than sports betting is illegal in California, such a bet would be illegal. While it’s unlikely to be prosecuted, as a contract it would be void for illegally and thus unenforceable.


4

Your lease states what your rights and obligations are: you cannot unilaterally change those terms, nor can the landlord. Providing a functioning lock on the door is a statutory obligation of the landlord, and the landlord gets to say what kind of lock is installed as long as the device functions, and isn't impossible for the tenant to operate. If the ...


4

Is the contractor liable? It depends. Trespass and conversion would be the applicable torts. In some jurisdictions, those are strict liability torts, in others they are intentional torts. The contractor lacks intent, but did participate in the act. I haven't yet had a chance to check out California in particular. California appears to come close to a ...


3

Written promise pre-purchase vs signed agreement, what's stronger? The signed agreement is decisive because it "states that it supersedes any previous agreements". The language portrays that the customer no longer considers the refund option a requirement for moving forward with the transaction. Signing that contract without the right to a refund ...


2

Assuming that the above can be established by admissible evidence, that sounds like a case for first degree murder, and probably various other crimes as well. In some jurisdictions there is a specific crime of "Murder for hire" which might also apply if available on the jurisdiction where this occurred. A comment mentions a possible insanity ...


2

Transporting Lithium Batteries Lithium batteries are regulated as a hazardous material under the U.S. Department of Transportation's (DOT's) Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR; 49 C.F.R., Parts 171-180). The HMR apply to any material DOT determines is capable of posing an unreasonable risk to health, safety, and property when transported in commerce. ...


2

I am in the middle of my current fixed-term lease and have always had a mechanical key-based lock on my apartment door. My landlord has announced that the doors of all apartments will shortly be converted to electronic "smart locks". The smart-lock maker's website says that any use of their product constitutes agreement to their terms of service. ...


2

That's not how contracts work. Essentially, all of your arguments are correct. A company can't impose terms on you by just throwing them up on a website and saying telling you that you agree to them. You haven't agreed to anything, they haven't given you anything that you didn't already have, and your landlord can't rope you into the contract, either. If you ...


2

Overview In California a landlord owes a limited duty to tenants to maintain safety and security. The landlord must take reasonable steps against reasonably foreseeable dangers, including from crime. The exact steps required will depend on the specific circumstances, but will require provision of deadbolt locks at a minimum. None of the sources I found dealt ...


2

Legally, you have a right under both common law and the First Amendment to access virtually all of the court's records in the case. Courthouse News Serv. v. Planet, 750 F.3d 776, 786 (9th Cir. 2014) (“Though the Supreme Court originally recognized the First Amendment right of access in the context of criminal trials, the federal courts of appeals have widely ...


1

There are two questions here: Is it really the police, or someone pretending to be the police in order to stage a home invasion? If it is the police they will be wearing uniforms and showing you their badges. I don't know how common it is for criminals to impersonate police officers. Do they have a valid search warrant? Once you have established that they ...


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