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4

In normal commercial situations there is the principle of freedom of contract where parties are free to contract with whom they choose. As a result of this principle, they are also free to not choose to contract with whom they choose (i.e. refuse to serve someone). There are limits, such as if it could be argued that by doing so contravenes other laws, ...


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Nothing that I see in that part of the agreement bars the consultant from publicly disclosing the client (see below though). Confidential information (CI) is anything that would be considered proprietary information by the party, something that isn't general public knowledge. If you are in doubt of something being CI, ask your client. Technically you should ...


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Absolutely. The person having control other the establishment can disallow you to enter unless the reason is illegal discrimination. They don’t need to cite any law, “I don’t want you in here” is enough reason. No explanation needed why and if they give an explanation, “I don’t like your face” is enough.


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Does the product name or the corresponding "ordinary commercial terms" provided by the Nice Classification constitute the "name of the goods"? As used here, "name of the goods" means the word used to denote that sort of thing generically. So if the article in question is a knife, the name of the goods in English is "knife,...


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In the US, the primary question is the nature of the premise that the person enters. If the premise is open to the public, restricting access is harder to justify. If the premise is restricted, access can be restricted pretty arbitrarily, apart from infringing on a person's property interest in the facility. A laboratory, for example, may restrict access to ...


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