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4

Canada's local court systems and procedural rules vary, especially at the lowest level, by province. So, I'm just stating some general principals. General speaking legal arguments are limited to closing arguments of the parties after all of the evidence has been presented by both sides (because this limits legal arguments to those with evidentiary support ...


3

A settlement is fundamentally a contract where parties A and B promise to do certain things (one of them being "stop litigating"). A court order is an enforceable order to do something. A contract cannot be directly enforced (where force is used to make a person comply), it requires a court order for actual enforcement. The conditions of a contract might be ...


2

The court is ordering the appellant to pay the respondent for any court costs it has paid. The losing party in a lawsuit is frequently ordered to reimburse the prevailing party for whatever it costs it may have incurred. Those costs typically come in the form of fees for various actions taken by the clerk, from the filing of the complaint to sending ...


2

Would it be illegal if I go to her house and take my stuff back? Yes. There is a dispute about who owns the property - you say its yours and she says its hers. One of you is wrong. If its you, then taking it would be a crime. You could take her to court and prove that you own the items and get an order for their return. Be aware that she might be right ...


2

You can't sue him for wasting time, but you can probably add interest for the delay. You can also use his previous agreements to pay you as further evidence of the debt, especially if you have them in writing (emails you sent him at the time do count for this).


1

In Canada, you would have to satisfy the requirements of software as medical device. As a diagnostic device, it would be subject to regulation. Here is the law: you need to understand and comply with that. §10 requires you to take reasonable measures to (a) identify the risks inherent in the device;(b) if the risks can be eliminated, eliminate them; (c) ...


1

Both student and professor would be guilty of academic dishonesty. This is not, anywhere that I know of, a statutory offense, but academic institutions take it very seriously. The student would probably be regraded as having failed, and would likely be expelled. If the student had already graduated when the bribe was discovered, the university might declare ...


1

Probably none. Being a university professor is not a regulated business, and the only conceivable legal limits would be in the case of statutorily-regulated government institutions. I do not know if there has ever been a case where a university professor was sued for damages resulting from raising a grade (hence allowing a student to pass, therefore to get a ...


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