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19

Canada may have specific different laws, but in most countries any legal tender must be accepted for payment of a debt. There are subtleties; in the UK for example more than 20 one penny coins are not legal tender. Old coins or banknotes may cease to be legal tender at some point and can only be exchanged at a bank; it seems Canada's $10 bill is nowhere near ...


13

What interests me, is if the company that will be fulfilling the "abracadabra" request is able to not provide "hocus pocus" emails (internally — or later in the litigation, if the truth is uncovered — justifying it that the team fulfilling the request does not speak the language and was unaware of the existence of these communications in ...


9

It's best to use formal names in legal documents. For example, Ringo Starr's musical compositions are credited to Richard Starkey. If you have a business that wishes to do business under a name other than its legal name, you can investigate d/b/a ("doing business as") designation. For the purpose of a single contract or other document, you can ...


5

Referring to your business in a contract, in any other term than what it was incorporated as in its founding documents is a bad idea. Generally speaking, there is a rule that a court will construe ambiguous contract terms against the drafter of the agreement. This only applies when one party is in a superior bargaining position. If both parties are in a ...


4

CBC, the public Canadian broadcaster, quotes the Bank of Canada: Even though it is legal currency, the Bank of Canada says it is not mandatory for Canadian businesses to accept cash. According to the Bank of Canada, retailers don't have to take bills or coins "because both parties must agree on the payment method." I find that surprising because ...


3

The Canadian Human Rights Act states 5 It is a discriminatory practice in the provision of goods, services, facilities or accommodation customarily available to the general public (a) to deny, or to deny access to, any such good, service, facility or accommodation to any individual, or (b) to differentiate adversely in relation to any individual, on a ...


2

Does the employer have some sort of responsibility to fairly resolve this? Yes. Although yelling or swearing at someone is not necessarily illegal, much of what you describe sounds in coworker's improper activity or behaviour and violence as defined in sections 4.24 and 4.27 of the BC Occupational Health and Safety Regulation. By failing to effectively ...


2

An employer has a duty of care to employees and must take steps to ensure their safety. Notably: 125 (1) Without restricting the generality of section 124, every employer shall, in respect of every work place controlled by the employer and, in respect of every work activity carried out by an employee in a work place that is not controlled by the employer, ...


2

Can management tell employees not to: accept cash from a customer then pay with their personal credit card because store doesn't take cash? Yes. This has to do with the employer's freedom of contract I mentioned in a previous answer. The employer's rule "I enter these sale contracts only with people who pay with credit card and who are not my employees&...


2

It is illegal to discriminate on the basis of "national or ethnic origin" This is spelled out in the Canadian Human Rights Act s3(1). However, a person's citizenship is something that can (must) be discriminated on. Unless it is being used as a proxy for "national or ethnic origin". Right to work in Canada To be allowed to work in Canada, ...


1

The customers are able to leave, so there's no reason it could be a crime. Even if they weren't able to operate the lock themselves, they are presumably able to leave by asking a staff member. There is no way this could be remotely considered false imprisonment. Depending on the layout and size of the store and presence/lack of other fire exits, this might ...


1

Employment and human rights law are mostly provincial if the employer/service provider is not federally regulated. Federally regulated sectors are out of provincial jurisdiction with respect to employment and are subject to the federal Acts (Canadian Human Rights Act, Canada Labour Code) instead. Citizenship is a enumerated protected ground in Ontario. ...


1

That site is claiming that by accessing the site, a user is consenting to have cookies set and read. Whether that claim is legally valid is another question. Under the various EU national laws to implement the e-privacy directive it would not be, because those laws use the same standard for consent as the GDPR, and simple access is not good enough to ...


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