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As a courtesy, you may give a reminder to the landlord with appropriate citation of BC law, but you are not required to do so. §38(1) says what the landlord must do, and §36(6)(b) compels him to pay double the deposit for failure to refund in time (noting that "in time" is based on the later of the end of the tenancy and you providing a forwarding ...


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You would be importing them to Canada when they crossed the border, and importing them to the U.S. when they crossed back. If there are duties on those goods, you would pay two iterations of customs duties on them. I am not aware of any exemption that applies. Sometimes there are special exemptions for goods kept in temporary port side warehouses with a ...


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Does the product name or the corresponding "ordinary commercial terms" provided by the Nice Classification constitute the "name of the goods"? As used here, "name of the goods" means the word used to denote that sort of thing generically. So if the article in question is a knife, the name of the goods in English is "knife,...


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Nothing that I see in that part of the agreement bars the consultant from publicly disclosing the client (see below though). Confidential information (CI) is anything that would be considered proprietary information by the party, something that isn't general public knowledge. If you are in doubt of something being CI, ask your client. Technically you should ...


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You 100% owe the fee. Industry standard incoterms are DAP (Delivered At Place) in which the recipient is responsible for any d&t charges or clearance fees associated with a given country along with any VAT/D&T charges. For Canada there is a CEF that is not a FedEx generated fee. FedEx paid the fee on your behalf for your import. Second part, your ...


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Like the situation in the US, Canadian copyright law distinguish ideas, which are not protected, from expression, which is protected. See Deeks v. Wells, OR 818. Person B is not allowed to copy (including copy and modify, copy modify and reproduce) a work produced by person A, so in the lawsuit, A must establish that B did copy. One form of evidence would be ...


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This wouldn't be rare at all, but very common. If a dozen reporters report about the same accident, murder, court case et cetera, the facts, being facts, are not copyrighted, but each ones article about what happened has individual copyright protection. If you copy one article without license, that one reporter (or their employee) can sue you for copyright ...


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In normal commercial situations there is the principle of freedom of contract where parties are free to contract with whom they choose. As a result of this principle, they are also free to not choose to contract with whom they choose (i.e. refuse to serve someone). There are limits, such as if it could be argued that by doing so contravenes other laws, ...


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In the US, the primary question is the nature of the premise that the person enters. If the premise is open to the public, restricting access is harder to justify. If the premise is restricted, access can be restricted pretty arbitrarily, apart from infringing on a person's property interest in the facility. A laboratory, for example, may restrict access to ...


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Absolutely. The person having control other the establishment can disallow you to enter unless the reason is illegal discrimination. They don’t need to cite any law, “I don’t want you in here” is enough reason. No explanation needed why and if they give an explanation, “I don’t like your face” is enough.


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