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The court is ordering the appellant to pay the respondent for any court costs it has paid. The losing party in a lawsuit is frequently ordered to reimburse the prevailing party for whatever it costs it may have incurred. Those costs typically come in the form of fees for various actions taken by the clerk, from the filing of the complaint to sending ...


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In the US, it may be worth looking into news articles surrounding the recent college admissions bust. It seems that the abstract structure of that issue is similar to the one you're asking about (I'm only talking about the situations involving bribing a school official, not the falsification which is a different story): a student or representative of the ...


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Would it be illegal if I go to her house and take my stuff back? Yes. There is a dispute about who owns the property - you say its yours and she says its hers. One of you is wrong. If its you, then taking it would be a crime. You could take her to court and prove that you own the items and get an order for their return. Be aware that she might be right ...


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Canada's local court systems and procedural rules vary, especially at the lowest level, by province. So, I'm just stating some general principals. General speaking legal arguments are limited to closing arguments of the parties after all of the evidence has been presented by both sides (because this limits legal arguments to those with evidentiary support ...


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You can't sue him for wasting time, but you can probably add interest for the delay. You can also use his previous agreements to pay you as further evidence of the debt, especially if you have them in writing (emails you sent him at the time do count for this).


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In Canada, you would have to satisfy the requirements of software as medical device. As a diagnostic device, it would be subject to regulation. Here is the law: you need to understand and comply with that. §10 requires you to take reasonable measures to (a) identify the risks inherent in the device;(b) if the risks can be eliminated, eliminate them; (c) ...


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A settlement is fundamentally a contract where parties A and B promise to do certain things (one of them being "stop litigating"). A court order is an enforceable order to do something. A contract cannot be directly enforced (where force is used to make a person comply), it requires a court order for actual enforcement. The conditions of a contract might be ...


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Common law countries -- such as Canada -- do not usually allow these types of actions. There may be exceptions for "abuse of process" cases, in which the plaintiff generally alleges that the other party was pursuing the litigation in bad faith.


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Both student and professor would be guilty of academic dishonesty. This is not, anywhere that I know of, a statutory offense, but academic institutions take it very seriously. The student would probably be regraded as having failed, and would likely be expelled. If the student had already graduated when the bribe was discovered, the university might declare ...


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Probably none. Being a university professor is not a regulated business, and the only conceivable legal limits would be in the case of statutorily-regulated government institutions. I do not know if there has ever been a case where a university professor was sued for damages resulting from raising a grade (hence allowing a student to pass, therefore to get a ...


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I don't know the rules in Canada, but given the shared history, I'd guess the options are the same as in the United States. Over here, the settlement typically leads to a dismissal of the case with prejudice, meaning that there's no more you can do within that case, forcing you to bring a new suit for breach of the settlement agreement. The exception would ...


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The law that states that the parents have an obligation to the children's education is called the family act, which states: Child support is usually paid to support children who are under the age of 19, or who are 19 or older but are unable to support themselves, including because they are going to college or university. for in the case of divorce I've ...


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The Civil Resolution Tribunal is part of the court system, and the decisions they issue, called "consent resolution orders", are legally binding just like court decisions are. Enforcement is done through the court system; the next step involves the BC provincial courts. (A settlement through the CRT is roughly equivalent to a decision in small-claims court....


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You cannot sue again The matter is res judicata - the only options are enforcement or an agreement between the parties.


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You can be fired in Canada for criticizing the employer, or even complaining about the weather. There is a distinction between Termination Without Cause and Termination With Cause. In the latter case, which requires a serious reason related to the employee's conduct, you can be fired without advance notice and with no severance pay. If the employees actions ...


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A summary is here. In Ontario, couples keep what they brought to the marriage but split what was gained during the marriage 50-50 except where one partner brought the matrimonial home into the marriage (unless there is a marriage contract or separation agreement). Its complicated - Joe and Jane need lawyers.


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