47

No Law enforcement are allowed to use “reasonable force” to effect an arrest. They are also allowed to use reasonable force to prevent imminent harm to people or property. As described, the felon is not a danger to other people or property and a drone strike would be an ineffective means of effecting an arrest. The force used is not reasonable. Nor can the ...


21

No, not in texas anyway. I have not reviewed the other death-sentence states but assume they will follow similar procedures: Article 43.19 of the Texas Code of Criminal Procedure defines the place of execution: The execution shall take place at a location designated by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice in a room arranged for that purpose. Although ...


12

There is a special case to consider which you probably didn't have in mind but which may be relevant anyway. American citizens have been killed by targeted drone strikes. The government reasoned that they were combatants in an armed conflict with the United States. This designation as well as the decision to eliminate the target is made by the executive ...


8

To the best of my knowledge, there never has been any US law which authorizes killing or executing someone simply because of their low intelligence or mental illness. The arguments have been over cases where people were accused and convicted of serious, even horrific, crimes, but were sufficiently low in intelligence that it was argued that they would not ...


5

If the escaped convict is reasonably capable of being arrested without the use of deadly force, then as mentioned above, the use of a drone to apply deadly force would be excessive force. This could result in judgments against the agencies and individuals responsible for the use of excessive force. Just because the escapee is sentenced to death doesn't ...


5

Additional NO: While the Federal Government does retain the death penalty, it is rarely used and since Gregg v. Georgia, only sixteen people have been put to death by the Feds. All have been by lethal injection. The vast majority of Post-Gregg executions are done by state governments. The U.S. Military has not used the death penalty since 1961. Since its ...


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