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7

The date of the census is not specified in the US constitution. It only says The actual Enumeration shall be made within three Years after the first Meeting of the Congress of the United States, and within every subsequent Term of ten Years, in such Manner as they shall by Law direct. There is no requirement that "ten years" be interpreted precisely to ...


6

Short Answer You can be prosecuted for lying about race on the census, but it takes some pretty specific and narrow conditions and isn't a concern for the vast majority of people. Long Answer There are two analytically distinct questions. The first is whether you can lie on the census about race. The answer is "yes", you can lie on the census about ...


4

In reality, nothing will probably happen. There is no record of anybody being prosecuted for ignoring the census since 1970 (as of 2014, the article hasn't been updated since then). 13 U.S. Code § 221.Refusal or neglect to answer questions; false answers: (a)Whoever, being over eighteen years of age, refuses or willfully neglects, when requested by the ...


3

An additional bar to prosecution for "lying" about race is that you cannot be prosecuted for anything you say on the census. 13 USC 9 mandates that all individual reports must be kept confidential, and cannot be shared or used for purposes other than the intended statistical one (if illegally obtained, the report would be poison fruit). This document by the ...


2

Under 2 U.S. Code § 2a, (a) On the first day, or within one week thereafter, of the first regular session of the Eighty-second Congress and of each fifth Congress thereafter, the President shall transmit to the Congress a statement showing the whole number of persons in each State, excluding Indians not taxed, as ascertained under the seventeenth and each ...


2

Here is a little bit on different methods, and Wikipedia says that this is the Huntington-Hill method being the currently employed one. Here is the statute, 2 USC 2a, which requires using "the method known as the method of equal proportions", which is not statutorily defined. Here is the original act of Congress. This document from the Census ...


2

The Census Clause (Art. 1 Section 2) requires "counting the whole number of persons in each State", so they don't count houses, they count people. There is a perennial question about their methods of counting: they use a variety of methods. Ever since there has been a census, the law has them counting people in their usual residence, and the Census Bureau ...


2

You're reading section 9(a) to say far more than it actually says. What section 9(a) is meant to do is keep individual Census responses confidential. Let's go over the full subsection: (a) Neither the Secretary, nor any other officer or employee of the Department of Commerce or bureau or agency thereof, or local government census liaison, may, except as ...


2

13 USC 9 only allows "sworn officers and employees of the Department or bureau or agency thereof to examine the individual reports", so a report from John Doe could not be extracted and scrutinized – it can't be used to determine whether John Doe has 2 bathrooms. Information from all of the reports can be used to report statistics, such as the number of ...


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