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4

It looks to me as if "money laundering" is a misunderstanding; though any organization has a duty to prevent this, charities have no special responsibilties. However, charity law does in general terms prevent a charity from giving money to a cause that does not further the charity's aims. The Charity Commission's guidance says "Charities can only spend ...


4

Your assumption about charities, "that legally you cannot use any of the money raised/created for anything but charitable purposes" is incorrect. For example, a charitable organization can have an office, and can pay rent for that office; it can pay a janitor to clean up, a secretary to do correspondence, and a CEO to run the operation. The basic ...


3

Non-Profits Need Not Have Owners But Must Have A Lawful Purpose Any non-profit company, for example, a 501(c)(3), is ownerless and can be run by a self-perpetuating board if desired, rather than having delegates that provide an outside source for new board members. In that case you have to set forth a purpose of the company or trust, to which its assets and ...


2

There is no limitation, as a general rule, on how much of a tax-exempt nonprofit's donations can be used for overhead costs in California. Some organizations may have a purpose for which overhead is a legitimate use of 100% of donations. Private foundations (which are tax-exempt non-profits, which (to oversimplify) receive most of their donations from a ...


2

Under U.S. federal tax law: In general, a discount on a service provided to a charity is not tax-deductible. There is no deduction for "opportunity cost." So, for example, if you bill professionally at $100/hour, but you offer service to a qualified charity at $25/hour, you do not get to deduct $75/hour of your time. But you can generally deduct the value ...


1

The organization has to be organized and operated exclusively for exempt purposes, which the IRS characterizes as charitable, religious, educational, scientific, literary, testing for public safety, fostering national or international amateur sports competition, and preventing cruelty to children or animals. The term charitable is used in its ...


1

The legal concept of a trust originates in English trust law. Virtually all common law jurisdictions have varied or added to this body of law, but I will refer to English law as a useful starting point. A full answer to your question is impossible without specifying a particular transaction involving particular property and people in a particular ...


1

In the U.S. it could be considered fraudulent to solicit money for a purpose and then to direct the money to anything else, including the costs of solicitation or performance of a feat associated with the solicitation. One could also run afoul of the federal gift tax if one collected more than the exempt amount from a single donor and used any of it for ...


1

The legal requirements for the health and safety of individuals in a building open to the public are fully outlined at your local town, city and/or county offices, and are very localized in nature; one answer will not suffice for all locations. Relevant rules and regulations may also be outlined at the state and federal (US) level and the Home Office (UK) ...


1

You need to follow federal law and establish a non-profit charitable organization in order to legally accept donations as a charity - online or by other methods - and have those donations be legal to accept (and possibly tax-deductible to the donor). According to federal law, Public charities must be organized and operated exclusively for exempt ...


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It is common for large US corporate employers to have an employee donations program, often through United Way, sometimes organized by the company or through some other aggregator. Every such company that I have been involved with (at least 5 that I have worked for) had a prominent statement that all donations were voluntary and would have no effect on ...


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Apparently the "requirement" to donate is technically informal and was not announced prior to employment. However, it is common knowledge that employees who don't donate will not get promoted or advance within the company. The donations are taken from the employee's paychecks. Obviously they can not force to donate. But by the looks they are not ...


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It will be fraud under section 2 of the Fraud Act 2006. See the CPS guidance for prosecution: http://www.cps.gov.uk/legal/d_to_g/fraud_act/ and http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2006/35/section/2 Upto 10 years in jail or an (almost) unlimited fine. I don't know whether they would actually go to jail, but I suspect there might be an element of "make ...


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