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We could start with what the statutes say (HSC 102425) (a) The certificate of live birth for a live birth occurring on or after January 1, 2016, shall contain those items necessary to establish the fact of the birth and shall contain only the following information; (1) Full name and sex of the child. It says nothing about the form of that name. ...


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Will you be in legal trouble for child pornography? No. The legal definition of child pornography generally requires things such as "sexually explicit conduct" or "lewd and lascivious display". Mere nudity does not rise to this standard; photographic documentation of suspected physical abuse comes nowhere near it. Will you get in trouble for not ...


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In Germany, there is no concept that corresponds directly to public domain. You automatically hold the Urheberrecht (~ copyright) for all creative works that you make, and it can't be given up or transferred (§29 UrhG). The work only enters the Gemeinfreiheit (~public domain) 70 years after your death. You can however license Verwertungsrechte (economic ...


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You'd have to look careful for example at the Taiwanese law. Does it disallow companies in Taiwan to hire minors, or does it disallow minors to take jobs in Taiwan? In 99.99% of all cases the effect would be the same, but in this case the minor is in Taiwan, and the company in the USA. If their law disallows minors to take jobs, then the matter is clear. If ...


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No law in the US requires that parent and child have the same last name. It is usual that a child's name match that of at least one parent, but not required. A parent can change his or her name, without changing the names of any existing children. Also, when a child is adopted, the child's name need not be changed to match the name of the parents, or either ...


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is there anything i can do to prevent my ex from costing us our home and my husbands job by making false reports, thus sending more police to our home for no reason at all?? Many laws are similar across states. Thus, in your jurisdiction there might be a statute akin to Michigan's MCL 722.633(5), sanctioning "[a] person who intentionally makes a false ...


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Disclaimer: I don't know the specific regulations of New Jersey, so this mostly describes the general practise in the United States. However, it seems the rules are roughly similar in all states. During a divorce proceeding the court ordered the father to pay 1xxx a month in child support through the court/state supervision arrangement. This is ...


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The court itself will do little unless there is imminent danger to the child. You are mostly responsible for finding a lawyer to file a court order, or getting other legal aid to do that, or taking actions that you can do yourself, like applying for wage and bank garnishments. The court (ideally) operates as a neutral party in the dispute; the court depends ...


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Taiwanese law applies to employees in Taiwan regardless of their citizenship.


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Short Answer I was wondering if it exists the possibility of signing a legal agreement before impregnation that states legally that both parents compromise into offering shared physical custody of the child to each other in case of divorce or separation. Do theses types of contract exists? are they legal? I currently live in Switzerland, but the question is ...


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Such a contract is unenforceable Family law is primarily concerned with the best interests of the child(ren); not the wishes of the parents. If the relationship breaks down, the court will decide custody arrangements based on the law.


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Your legal name is your legal name and your child’s legal name is their legal name. For legal purposes you have to use your legal name. When you name your child there is a convention that they take the father’s or mother’s (or both) last name but you can give them any name you like (subject to names the state restricts). In general usage, you can call ...


1

In Australia you can seek an injunction in a court of competent jurisdiction; for a family law matter this is the Family Court. You will usually have a hearing and a ruling within 24 to 48 hours. Given that you don’t know this, it’s probably something you will need a lawyer for.


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