20

His statement suggests that he was at one time employed in a diplomatic function (and that assumes that he had diplomatic "papers" because of his employ), how does one lose that status, and is there any action that he is required to take to relinquish that status? Diplomatic personnel with official diplomatic status under the relevant treaties and for ...


10

To supplement ohwilleke's answer (and drawing on a State dept. legal guidance document), there are three categories of "diplomat": diplomatic agents, members of the administrative and technical staff, and members of the service staff. With respect to the current issue, what is relevant is whether a person is subject to the jurisdiction of the US – this is ...


7

Insofar as those treaties don't bind the US, the notion of "violating" such laws is moot. Hoda Muthana is, under Yemeni law, a Yemeni citizen (it is immaterial whether she has ever "accepted" or exploited it), and as such stripping her of US citizenship would not leave her stateless. In the case of Hoda Muthana, the action is based on the legal argument ...


6

Public schools are open to all residents. There is no citizenship requirement and no "tax payer" requirement. Unless excepted for home schooling or attending a recognized private school, in most locations it would not only be allowed, but mandatory between certain ages.


6

If you falsely claim to be a US citizen in order to obtain work, vote in a US election, or receive public benefits in the United States, you can be deported, lose a green card, or be banned from ever obtaining a green card or US Visa. See https://dyanwilliamslaw.com/2015/02/why-lying-about-being-a-u-s-citizen-can-stop-you-from-becoming-a-permanent-resident-...


5

Here is everything that I learnt throughout this process: I was not born a U.S. citizen, and I did not naturalise. Instead, I inherited U.S. citizenship at the moment I became an LPR (Legal Permanent Resident), because I both had a parent with citizenship and I was under the age of 18. There is no paperwork to file to inherit citizenship this way, it is ...


5

The only people the law does not apply to are " persons licensed by the US Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control." http://www.visitcuba.com/travel-guide/travel-tips/special-note-to-usa-travellers/ If you have close family there the license is not needed. If you qualify to travel on a general license for family travel, you do not ...


4

This is controlled by 8 U.S.C. § 1401 which details who qualifies for "birthright citizenship". Including of course the condition mandated by the 14th ammendment, Congress is otherwise free to bestow such citizenship essentially as it pleases by duly enacted legislation. One of the cases that receives birthright citizenship is a person of unknown ...


4

The Czech Consulate General in New York has a page about this. Presumably a similar situation would prevail at other Czech consulates, so this answer should help even if you do not reside in its territory. The page notes that if you are not "a relative" you can "enclose an explanation letter why do you need the duplicate of the birth [or marriage] ...


4

This FAQ from the US embassy in Korea explains all of the concerns that a Korean-American might have. If you have a Korean lational parent, you are automatically Korean. Before March 31 of the year you turn 18, you must renounce your Korean citizenship, lest you be then subject to the military service law. If you were a Korean citizen and then gained another ...


3

There are two models for citizenship, by location of birth and by the nationality of the parent. The US chiefly follows the first model, which is why only your grandma's father is American, and your grandma is not. By the same logic, you are not. Countries like Spain are far more lenient, and do allow you to request Spanish citizenship if you can show any ...


3

Yes, depending on the local registration laws of the country in question, when you have a residence in that country. You can also be a resident of multiple countries under the same conditions. You can also be considered a non- resident citizen of your own country. In the European Union, Residence Laws are national laws only for periods up to 3 months ...


3

It depends on the issuing country. The primary purpose of a passport is to enable the holder to travel internationally, not to prove citizenship. Most countries only issue passports to their citizens, which has made such passports widely recognised as proof of citizenship — both inside and outside of the issuing country. But at the end of the day it is up ...


3

It's important to be clear about what you mean by "benefit," but if you're truly obtaining no legally cognizable benefit, then a lie about citizenship status is protected by the First Amendment. The government may not use it as the basis to take any action against you. Under U.S. v. Alvarez, 567 U.S. 709 (2012), the fact that speech is false is not enough ...


3

When the person has been naturalised, that is, when the US government officially recognises them as a US citizen. There are many pathways to citizenship and the ones on the linked page are pretty typical across the world although the details vary: residence for a period with or without marriage to a citizen service descent.


2

tl;dr Yes, the federal government considers Native peoples to be part of the U.S., accords them citizenship, and extends a special type of self-governing authority to the nations. Background The federal government accords recognized Native American groups a special type of self-governing authority: that of "domestic dependent nations." Cherokee Nation v. ...


2

The primary intention of the 14th, and its largest effect, was of course to confer citizenship on blacks, particularly the former slaves. But it also constitutionalized the rule of "birthright citizenship" (aka jus soli), and removed any bars based on national origin or ethnicity. Prior to the 14th, naturalization was a federal matter, and Congress could ...


2

The details are specified in 8 CFR 204.1(f). In this case you would need evidence that X is a sibling, and "must be in the form of primary evidence, if available". But, "When it is established that primary evidence is not available, secondary evidence may be accepted". The service (US Customs and Immigration Service) "will refer to the Department of State's ...


2

The Immigration and Nationality Act doesn't seem to give any way for a non-US-national to become a non-citizen US national. A non-US-national can only obtain US nationality by obtaining US citizenship at the same time -- via naturalization (whether automatic or through a process). The only ways to become a non-citizen US national seem to be 1) at birth, ...


2

You can still become a citizen. Here is a site that shows you how to apply for a replacement. https://www.uscis.gov/green-card/after-green-card-granted/replace-a-green-card You are supposed to apply for one even if the interview is coming soon.


2

As described in this Wikipedia article a person born outside of the United States may become a US citizen if at least one of the persons parents is a US citizen, and various other conditions are complied with. These conditions differ depending on whether the mother, the father, or both are US citizens, and whether the parents were married at the time of ...


2

Presumably you are asking a legal question and not hoping to generate opinionated discussion. In which case, it matters what country we are talking about. In the US, there is a legal concept "lawful permanent resident" which you can apply for (if you are legally here, reside here for 5 years, and are of good moral character). This comes with a number of ...


2

I have heard that you have to spend at least six months in a year in US to remain eligible for naturalization. Is that really true? No, that is not true. There is no requirement regarding amount of time you have to spend in the US in a year. The only requirements are the continuous residence requirement and the physical presence requirement. You are ...


1

The Apply for Citizenship | USCIS site seems to contain the needed information. Step 2. Determine if you are eligible to become a U.S. citizen. Going through the Naturalization Eligibility Worksheet contained in the pdf gives in great detail, with possible rules of exceptions, how your times outside the US will be treated and if you still qualify. ...


1

IANAL and the standard disclaimers apply. That being said, Wikipedia indicates: Section 202(c)(3) of the Real ID Act[29] requires the states to "verify, with the issuing agency, the issuance, validity, and completeness of each document" that is required to be presented by a driver's license applicant to prove their identity, birth date, legal ...


1

I don't think that un-revoking your grandfather's German citizenship would help you, since your father naturalized to obtain British citizenship before your birth, and German citizenship is automatically lost upon voluntary acquisition of a foreign nationality, so even if your grandfather's German citizenship had not been revoked, the German citizenship your ...


1

I believe that, generally, who is a country's national or citizen is solely determined by the law of that country, and there is no general "international law" regarding revoking citizenship. There is that Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness, and countries that are party to it agree to not revoke citizenship if it would make the person stateless (...


1

and it looks like a form N-600 would have been submitted Not necessarily. If you were a permanent resident under 18 living in the US with a US citizen parent, you automatically became a US citizen, and thereafter you can apply for a US passport directly without getting a Certificate of Citizenship first. Many people who derived US citizenship as permanent ...


1

What code will specify the consequence? 8 USC 911, false personation of a US citizen. As noted in other answers, the circumstances you describe suggest that free speech considerations would protect you from conviction. am I removable? Similarly, as noted in another answer, inadmissibility and deportability are triggered if the lie was for the purpose ...


1

Since the Indian Citizenship Act of 1924 was passed, all Native Americans born within the US have been citizens by birth. Prior to this act Native Americans were in many ways treated as foreigners by the US. They were not citizens by birth, and their tribes had some but not all of the attributes of independent nations. The latter is still true, But I belie ...


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