42

Can I choose to not register my child as a US citizen? No. Your child will be a US citizen regardless of whether you register anything, and (unless you have spent less than 5 years in the US, or less than 2 years after you turned 14) regardless of the place of birth, because (in that case) even if the child is born outside the US he or she will be a US ...


17

The International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, in effect since 1976 and currently signed by about 179 countries, has in Article 12 Paragraph 4: No one shall be arbitrarily deprived of the right to enter his own country. It's not absolute, as it would allow for a person to be deprived of that right if it weren't "arbitrary". But it's ...


8

The wikipedia article on "Right of Return" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Right_of_return) cites several treaties: The right of return principle has been codified in a number of international instruments, including: Hague Regulations (HR), article 20: After the conclusion of peace, the repatriation of prisoners of war shall be carried out as ...


5

This document from the Michigan Sec'y of State says that "A US citizen who has never resided in the US and has a parent, legal guardian or spouse that was last domiciled in Michigan is eligible to vote in Michigan as long as he or she has not registered or voted in another State". You then use the Federal Post Card Application or the Federal Write-...


4

This FAQ from the US embassy in Korea explains all of the concerns that a Korean-American might have. If you have a Korean lational parent, you are automatically Korean. Before March 31 of the year you turn 18, you must renounce your Korean citizenship, lest you be then subject to the military service law. If you were a Korean citizen and then gained another ...


4

A US citizen who resides abroad can register to vote in federal elections in the last state or territory where they resided in the US. So in your example, the US citizen who was resident in Puerto Rico, and who moves to Canada without first residing in any other state or territory, would register to vote in Puerto Rico. Since he is registered to vote in ...


4

Not normally The loss of citizenship is dealt with in Part 2 Division 3 of the Citizenship Act 2007. s32A contains a summary of the 5 ways it can happen: There are 5 ways in which you can cease to be an Australian citizen: you may renounce your Australian citizenship: see section 33; or if you did not automatically become an Australian citizen, the ...


4

The law upheld by the decision is a New York law, and thus only applies in the state of New York. Its current text reads in relevant part: No person shall be employed or authorized to teach in the public schools of the state who is... Not a citizen.  The provisions of this subdivision shall not apply, however, to an alien teacher now or hereafter employed,...


3

Your children may have automatically become US citizens at birth, depending on how long their mother lived in the US before they were born. US law says that any child born abroad to an unmarried US citizen mother is automatically a US citizen, as long as their mother had lived in the US continuously for at least one year before the child was born. There ...


3

Based on Irish law, specifically the Irish Nationality and Citizenship Act 1956, can I live abroad after naturalizing as an Irish citizen and retain my citizenship just by filling that form? Yes, subject of course to factual disputes. The statute (as amended) provides that this revocation is not possible when the citizen has "registered annually in ...


3

I have heard that you have to spend at least six months in a year in US to remain eligible for naturalization. Is that really true? No, that is not true. There is no requirement regarding amount of time you have to spend in the US in a year. The only requirements are the continuous residence requirement and the physical presence requirement. You are ...


3

Yes, depending on the local registration laws of the country in question, when you have a residence in that country. You can also be a resident of multiple countries under the same conditions. You can also be considered a non- resident citizen of your own country. In the European Union, Residence Laws are national laws only for periods up to 3 months ...


3

There's an answer at Irish Citizens Information, complete with a chart. First, it doesn't matter if the Irish ancestor was living in the Republic or in Northern Ireland. However, the ancestral right only extends to grandchildren unless you were born after 2015. Otherwise, your parent must have claimed Irish citizenship before you were born.


3

First, let's be clear. Under the relevant Australian law, this person is an Australian citizen, This is for two reasons. First, because he or she is descended from someone who was born in Australia in the time period from January 26, 1949 to August 19, 1986 (or who was a British subject born in Australia prior to January 26, 1949), and second, because a ...


2

Presumably you are asking a legal question and not hoping to generate opinionated discussion. In which case, it matters what country we are talking about. In the US, there is a legal concept "lawful permanent resident" which you can apply for (if you are legally here, reside here for 5 years, and are of good moral character). This comes with a number of ...


2

If you have a certified copy of the register of births, then as the comments point out, by definition your birth was registered in the UK and a record of this should exist in the General Register Office (GRO) and local registry office archives. As records are not removed from the registry, then it should still be there. I am not sure where you have been ...


2

7 FAM 1100, archived here from an old version of the Foreign Affairs Manual from 1995, goes into detail about issues regarding birthright citizenship for children of foreign diplomats. See 7 FAM 1116.2-(2,3,4), on pages 7-10 of the PDF. Unfortunately, later versions of the Foreign Affairs Manual no longer contain this information. The part that is relevant ...


2

As long as they have diplomatic immunity, they don't have a residency status. If either parent didn't have diplomatic immunity, then the child is a subject to the jurisdiction and they become a citizen at birth. The short explanation with the reasoning can be found on the uscis website. Namely Children born in the United States to accredited foreign ...


2

guten Glauben gelebt hat, das Schweizer Bürgerrecht zu besitzen The translation should be understood as: in good faith believes to be a Swiss citizen. Possible situation: When a parent is naturalized, the minor children are often also naturalized. For some reason, the naturalization took place on (or after) the day the child became an adult (thus was not a ...


2

The constitution of India doesn't explicitly talk about the freedom to enter India, it does however grant freedom of movement inside India with some reasonable restrictions (it is ironically not clearly defined as to what may be reasonable). Now it may be argued that for someone to be able to exercise their rights to this freedom, they must be allowed to ...


2

Short Answer If a bill like this was enacted, people with pending green card applications that are not authorized under the new law, like siblings and adult children of citizens and green card holders, will probably have their applications summarily denied. This is the likely outcome despite their often long years of patient waiting (unless the newly enacted ...


2

US law (8 USC 1451) allows the revocation of naturalization, and does not restrict such revocation to people having any particular actual or potential citizenship. The US is also not a party to the statelesness conventions. So it is possible to legally make a person stateless. The nationality law of Syria is kind of complex, being of the paternal jus ...


2

The case that you mentioned isn't an example of what you're talking about. One thing that immediately comes to mind is the Shamima Begum case. She fled her London home to join the Islamic state but now she wants to come back to the UK (after realizing), but UK's Home Office revoked her citizenship, claiming that she could claim Bangladesh citizenship by ...


1

You will need to satisfy the 5-year residency requirement in order to apply for British citizenship, regardless of how quickly you obtain Indefinite Leave to Remain. This implies that investors who receive ILR after 2 and 3 years, respectively, have to wait for 3 and 2 years before they can apply for citizenship. That is correct based on my understanding ...


1

Your best route will probably be using your BN(O) status as the UK has opened up a pathway to citizenship for Hong Kongers holding a BN(O) passport. You will be entitled to come to the UK for five years and then apply for citizenship after your sixth year of being here. I don't see any other entitlements for citizenship or ILR at the moment based on the ...


1

I believe you are correct about the children's British citizenship at birth -- the older one did not automatically get British citizenship at birth, and the younger one did. If you and the older child's mother subsequently married after birth, that would have been considered to have legitimated the child, and so the child would automatically have gotten ...


1

US citizenship is automatic. Documentation is also automatic if you birth inside the system. Birthing outside the system in order to not create documents won't work. You won't be allowed to travel without documents. So there would be no way to transport the child elsewhere in order to coin citizenship there, except in the mother's womb. And even that ...


1

At a high level Indian citizenship can be acquired in 3 ways: By Birth By Descent By Registration (aka Naturalization) At the time of the birth of your child, they are a citizen of India by descent. For this however you need to register the birth of the child with an Indian mission within 12 months of their birth. I know that you've said that you've chosen ...


1

It looks to me like such a thing is possible under 42 USC 265: Whenever the Surgeon General determines that by reason of the existence of any communicable disease in a foreign country there is serious danger of the introduction of such disease into the United States, and that this danger is so increased by the introduction of persons or property from such ...


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