New answers tagged

4

This FAQ from the US embassy in Korea explains all of the concerns that a Korean-American might have. If you have a Korean lational parent, you are automatically Korean. Before March 31 of the year you turn 18, you must renounce your Korean citizenship, lest you be then subject to the military service law. If you were a Korean citizen and then gained another ...


2

I have heard that you have to spend at least six months in a year in US to remain eligible for naturalization. Is that really true? No, that is not true. There is no requirement regarding amount of time you have to spend in the US in a year. The only requirements are the continuous residence requirement and the physical presence requirement. You are ...


0

The recent ruling of Jennings v. Rodriguez gives some clues. Rodriguez was detained for deportation, and sued, alleging entitlement to a bond hearing. His legal team constructed a theory that there was a 6 month limit on detentions. The lower court agreed, and (as reported in the SCOTUS ruling) Relying heavily on the canon of constitutional avoidance, the ...


0

The thought process to establish what is reasonable could differ from case to case, but generally, it is based on the conduct or suspected conduct of the detainee. The officer may detain the defendant long enough to conduct a short investigation as long as he is justified and has reason to suspect the offense has taken place. The specific time is not always ...


1

The Apply for Citizenship | USCIS site seems to contain the needed information. Step 2. Determine if you are eligible to become a U.S. citizen. Going through the Naturalization Eligibility Worksheet contained in the pdf gives in great detail, with possible rules of exceptions, how your times outside the US will be treated and if you still qualify. ...


3

Yes, depending on the local registration laws of the country in question, when you have a residence in that country. You can also be a resident of multiple countries under the same conditions. You can also be considered a non- resident citizen of your own country. In the European Union, Residence Laws are national laws only for periods up to 3 months ...


2

Presumably you are asking a legal question and not hoping to generate opinionated discussion. In which case, it matters what country we are talking about. In the US, there is a legal concept "lawful permanent resident" which you can apply for (if you are legally here, reside here for 5 years, and are of good moral character). This comes with a number of ...


0

Per U.S. law you are entitled to counsel with an attorney and the government must provide you one if you cannot afford one. Whatever you do, do not say a thing until you are provided with an attorney. Additionally, the U.S. is a signatory to treaties which require that the appropriate foreign mission must be contacted within 72 hours of detention of a ...


Top 50 recent answers are included