8

Your beliefs about your past and your mission would probably be considered to be personal religious beliefs. As Israel does not have a state religion this does not have any legal significance (except it may make a difference as to which religious court is considered to have jurisdiction over your family disputes). Your religious beliefs do not override the ...


8

It is hard to measure accuracy in absolute terms because figuring out the truth is the problem that trials seek to solve in the first place. This is especially true of cases that go to trial. Cases that are almost sure to be resolved one way or the other by any tier of fact generally plea bargain (in criminal cases) or settle prior to trial (in civil cases). ...


6

My vote is that the (prison, contract) term would not be enforceable. In Williams v. Walker-Thomas 350 F.2d 445, multiple items of furniture were purchased on credit, and the payments were "distributed" over all items so that no items were paid for until all items were paid for – thus the store could repossess all of the items, if one payment was missed. The ...


6

So, in short, the bank did what you asked them to do (close your account). What do you think they did that might be unlawful?


5

Interestingly enough, this has been planned - but not completed. South Korea: Robot Ethics Charter In 2007, South Korea worked towards establishing the Robot Ethics Charter, a guide for manufacturers a designers of robots. South Korea is a strong robotics and electronics manufacturer, and wants to expand robotics to help the economy. There were several ...


5

Generally speaking, the law in almost every common law and civil law jurisdiction does not allow incarceration to be a punishment for a mere breach of contract (when that breach of the contract was not intended at the time the contract was entered into by the parties by one of the parties but not the other). Historically, there was a remedy called "body ...


4

The Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination applies only in criminal trials, but it permits a witness to refuse to answer a question in either criminal or civil cases, including in a deposition. If he had committed crimes or thought that his answers might have incriminated him, he should have declined to answer. I'm not terribly familiar with this ...


4

It's unenforceable for the same reason that they can't kill you as a term of the contract - you cannot contract to do something against the law. Holding someone against their will is a crime. Only government has the right to imprison and only in accordance with relevant law.


3

Overview Trials and hearings before a judge aren't random, but they aren't terribly predictable either. The best empirical studies of high stakes felony jury trials suggest that the accuracy of a jury in a case that doesn't plea bargain is about 90%. They are right 90% of the time and wrong 10% of the time. The appeal process involving multiple instances ...


3

Very likely. You may own your parking space, but when you bought your condo you also signed a contract agreeing to abide by the rules of the condo association. Condo associations typically have rules that all cars parked on the property must be registered with the association. If you didn't register your friend's car with the association, they have no way ...


3

Issues considered Based on the papers you cite, it seems like its not even straightforward in U.S. law. They discuss three main legal questions that are obstacles to implementing an open-access policy: Is there a "teacher exception" to work for hire, giving researchers initial copyright over their papers? Does a non-exclusive partial rights ...


2

Thanks to this same map I started looking more into the different laws and I have now describe them all in mostly my own words (took me 16.5 hours in total) here is the section of napolionic law and germanic law. Hope it helps. Napoleonic Law In 1804 Napoleon I (Napoléon Bonaparte) established a new civil code which among other thing forbade privileges ...


2

Both Napoleonic and Germanic law are subdivisions of Civil Law and both are inheritors of late empire Roman Law plus ecclesiastical law and traditional law. The main differences between them are their route from the Roman Empire to the modern world. Napoleonic law was codified in 1804 under Napoleon I, unsurprisingly; and drew together the feudal laws of ...


2

Depending on the jurisdiction - yes, this may be enforceable. In most cases, if you have contractually agreed to a proper law for the contract, then that is the law that will apply. In those cases, if the proper law is California, for example, then that is the legal system that will apply and in these cases, if you attempted to bring or join a class or ...


2

It is almost certainly illegal. I was unable to find UK provisions but the penalties for stealing an Australian passport are 10 years imprisonment or a fine of up to 1,000 penalty units (at time of writing a penalty unit was $170 so, $170,000) (Section 32(4) of the Australian Passports Act 2005). Under this law, the crime is knowingly having it in your ...


2

We can take Harvard's policy as a concrete example, also see their FAQ (the official resolution does not seem to be publically available). The university summary is that "Each Faculty member grants to the President and Fellows of Harvard College permission to make available his or her scholarly articles and to exercise the copyright in those articles". The ...


2

This is an area of law that is in flux. For example, in Colorado, where I practice, the rule has changed over the last ten to thirty years. I'll provide a traditional and modern view of each. The intermediate view and to a lesser extent the modern view, also give more weight to individualized evidence of the intent of the parties on a case by case basis, ...


2

First, only the state, usually through the police or a public officer can take someone to court for a crime. If it is a crime then it is at their discretion if they believe the offence is serious enough to warrant this. Anyone can take anyone to court for a civil wrong (e.g. Breach of contract, a tort etc.). One of the many things that they will have to ...


2

Both civil law and common law have civil codes, so that isn't the difference. It is common in civil law jurisdictions for these to be called civil codes and consolidated into the great big book of law. In common law jurisdictions, the civil code is scattered through legislation, regulation, administrative and case law and often not consolidated although, ...


2

First off, let me confirm that this text accurately describes the reality. Second, this is less far afield from the common law than you would think. If you are in a jurisdiction without any binding case law on a particular point, a so called "question of first impression", you then turn to persuasive authority. Persuasive authority includes case law that ...


2

Sweden and most of the other Scandinavian countries once had a civil code based upon the Civil Code of 1734. Generally speaking, this code is in turn derived from the German Civil Code (as opposed to the French Civil Code), which is written in a more carefully defined, lawyer oriented manner than the French Civil Code which sought to be written in common ...


2

An "inquisitorial" system is one where the Judge or Magistrate actively questions the accused and witnesses to attempt to determine the facts. The Judge may also determine, at least in part, what witnesses to call in what order. An "adversarial" system is one in which each side presents its case, and the judge acts as an umpire deciding on procedure, and ...


2

If you paid by a credit card, the proper procedure is to simply do a chargeback. If the hotel doesn't back down, then the credit card network will hold arbitration. I wouldn't expect them to win, since they don't have anything but their word for it. The hotel does have the option of suing you, but it's unlikely that they will do so for £200, and again they ...


1

It is difficult to say for sure. The Tribunal Supremo de Justicia would decide the constitutionality of such a law, and it's not possible to predict how they would rule. Article 168 of the Bolivian Constitution limits the president and VP to 2 terms in a row: The period of the mandate of the President or Vice President is five years, and ...


1

To go slightly beyond the question asked to a related one, there is basically only one area other than criminal defense for which you are entitled to a publicly paid attorney to defend you. This is an action by the state to have your parental rights terminated for abuse or neglect, if you are indigent. Also, while lawyers are not available to the indigent, ...


1

The law does not, by itself provide the kind of help you're looking for. There are, however, legal services organizations that may be able to assist. The Pennsylvania Department of Human Services has links to several of them.


1

I'll give you three reasons: A second set of eyes. Every judge knows that what he does may be reviewed. A second set of eyes assists in ensuring everything went correctly. Most judges tend to be appeal adverse. Judge Rheinhardts are the rare exception. Appeals tend to look in more detail at a few set of issues. In a first level court, there can easily be ...


1

At the time of moving to another country for varying reasons, legalization of documents is required. It could be in different forms like apostille or attestation. Since Mauritius belongs to the Apostille Hague Convention, it requires your documents to obtain the apostille sticker from the concerned foreign affairs department of the nation. However, Indonesia ...


1

There are certainly situations where your thoughts turn something into a crime or not. Here's an interesting one (found when I tried to figure out what an "attempted crime" is): Let's say I give up my business and sell a lot of office equipment very cheap. You think that because it is cheap, it must be stolen, and you decide to buy some of my what you think ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible