52

Surely such a well meaning albeit naive driver wouldn't stand a chance in court if they said that it's because they've a section 230-like protection. Because Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act explicitly protects computer service providers from such charges. A driver is not a computer service provider, and the US legislature has never voted ...


38

This is a technical answer rather than a legal one. If those are unwelcome here, let me know My question revolves around why Gmail doesn't block "joe.schmoe@gmail.com" on the spot when it detects such an obvious fraud They often do. I am an admin on a G-suite domain, and I get several emails every month titled "Alert: User suspended due to suspicious ...


14

So many people have come up with ideas about spam that there is actually a standard "fill in the blanks" form for answering them! A copy can be found here. Filling in the blanks for your solution:- Your post advocates a (X) technical ( ) legislative ( ) market-based (X) vigilante approach to fighting spam. As well as the technical side, it ...


3

This is also admittedly more of a technical explanation than a legal one but it's relevant. The spammer presumably has control of multiple accounts. Whether the accounts were stolen from other users or created by the spammer themselves, they likely have not just one but hundreds, thousands, or even millions of accounts they can send scam mails from. It ...


1

In general, businesses can charge what they like for their products If the consumer does not like the price (or anything else) they are free to choose a different business or elect not to use the product. A business cannot change a contracted price during the course of a contract except as provided for in that contract. For the particular service you are ...


1

The whole point of a class-action lawsuit is that you don't need to do anything until the case is resolved (or, more likely, until the case is settled out of court). Instead, lawyers for the "representative plaintiff" (usually the person who started the lawsuit) handle things. Your involvement begins if the case is settled in favor of the plaintiff, at ...


1

You can sue them in small claims court if the court has jurisdiction. If they have any presence in the state, that might be sufficient. If they have no presence in the state, then you can't sue them in any state court in your state. Absent presence in your state, you would have to file in a state where they have a presence. (You can't file in federal court ...


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