36

If you were on your parents policy with the understanding you were a student in college, then yes, they can drop you and refuse to pay. You need to read the terms of the insurance very carefully, somewhere in there it says that the policy is only in effect while you are enrolled as a full time student. You (or your parents) broke this agreement, and the ...


9

You contracted for the services so the debt is yours. Even if the insurance company were legally obligated to pay, that does not shift the obligation from you to the insurance company. The dentist sues you for non-payment, you have to sue the insurance company for breach of contract to recover what they owe. You certainly can contact the insurance company ...


5

In the US it's very simple: How does the party that makes the lawsuit get the money in this scenario? They don't. Winning a lawsuit against a person is a legal confirmation that they really do owe you the money. It also gives you the ability to do certain things to try to collect: you could seize their assets or garnish their wages. If they don't have ...


4

The first step of a non-governmental debt collector would be to sue you and obtain a money judgment (if this debt collector is legitimate, something the comments touch upon). A tax debt is different, if this is a legitimate tax debt. There is usually an internal tax collection agency process that must be exhausted, resulting in an assessment of taxes which ...


4

Had I been informed before the procedure that my insurance wasn't going to cover it, I would have waited until Jan 2019 so that I could use my new insurance provided by my job. A lot will depend on whether your dentist attempted to validate the insurance before the procedure. If you or your dentist inquired, using your particular insurance plan, group, and ...


3

You can try, however, a US court when considering if it has jurisdiction will doubtless ask you to explain why a Canadian business wants to sue a Canadian company for an unpaid debt in Canadian dollars for services provided in Canada in a US court. If you can satisfy them that a US court is the appropriate venue (which I doubt) they will hear the case.


2

It is correct, per 15 USC 1692g, that the collector can wait until the consumer files notifies the collector of the debt, before sending verification. The law does not state what form that verification must take, and it would suffice if the collector provided evidence that services were rendered and not paid for. The verification can't just be a restatement ...


1

Under the ACA ("Obamacare"), young people can stay on their parents' insurance plan until age 26, regardless of your student status. (Wikipedia with references) Your list of options for what to do seems to assume that your parents' plan has some other requirement that you be in college. If you have not yet turned 26 (i.e. are 25 or younger) you should ...


1

You can (and should) file a formal complaint with the FTC's Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. From Wikipedia: In the United States, consumer third-party agencies are subject to the federal Fair Debt Collection Practices Act of 1977 (FDCPA), is administered by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). You can also file a formal complaint with the ...


1

Are there any law enforcement agencies or government bodies in the USA I could contact to report them to? If nothing else, these people need to be stopped - debt collectors who behave in such a way that they themselves need to be reported to debt collectors, aren't very useful. There is usually a state agency that regulates debt collections with whom ...


1

Is this likely to appear on my credit report, and can I dispute this even after agreeing to pay the amount I owed, plus an additional fee to the collector? It won't appear in your credit report because you readily made (or that's what I gather from your inquiry) the payment they requested. You might get within the next few days a letter from the ...


1

The primary problem is figuring out whether the charges are legal or not. You might have a continuing contractual obligation so you need to pay an early termination fee; or maybe not. (There is also the question of whether you think you don't and they think you do). The alleged obligation might be something one-time (i.e. an amount still unpaid). Whatever it ...


1

It's sent to collections like any other business would do if you do not pay them. Edit: I'm aware of several charities that will work with people who can't ordinarily afford to pay their bills to get them some relief, but this is usually reserved for ER patients in so far as I'm aware.


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