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Colorado statute 42-6-206 imposes disclosure requirements on the sale of vehicles with salvage titles. That you didn't know it was a salvage does not seem to be of concern to this particular statute. This means that you are potentially entitled to redress against the people who sold you the car as well, provided the sale occurred in Colorado and they ...


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The nature of the agreement matters as does the context and you'd have to know more facts to reliably answer. The default rule is "no" your signature wouldn't count to sign on behalf of your wife, but there are exceptions that might apply. There are also multiple ways that your action could be interpreted depending upon the context. One possibility is that ...


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Probably There are two relevant legal principles here: Apparent authority The legal question to be answered is if a reasonable person standing in the position of the contractor reasonably believe that you had your wife's authority to sign on her behalf? If the answer is yes (and it probably is) then your wife is bound to the contract. Unilateral mistake:...


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Like a paper signature in ink or blood, a finger squiggle is merely evidence that you have agreed to the terms of a contract. You have agreed, and now you are know the downside of that agreement. However, Colorado law gives you a special privilege to cancel certain contracts, and this may be one: here is the law. Under CO Rev Stat §5-3-402, with some ...


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This is a close call, in the example that you suggest, because it won't have been executed with the proper formalities and it isn't clear that the content at a url would be fixed in its language at the time that the Will is executed. Subject to an exception for personal property memorandums (and a more subtle one for powers of appointment in trusts) you can'...


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In the U.S. a codicil is for small amendments, but you can draft a new will if you choose to make large changes or to change the entire document. https://www.wikihow.com/Update-Your-Will You can use the URL, but a will is intended to be notarized so you should have a copy of whatever is on the website notarized. That would kind of defeat the purpose of the ...


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Yes But why? A will is static. Once made it can only be changed by codicil, however, it is generally recommended that you don’t do this - write a new will revoking all former wills instead. The last thing your heirs want to worry about when they are (presumably) grieving your death is a hard to interpret will written in a non-conventional way. At the end ...


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