5

A gift creates a permanent transfer of title from the giver to the receiver. That is, a gift cannot be taken back. To be a gift there must be: Intention of donor to give the gift to the donee (donative intent) Delivery of gift to donee. Acceptance of gift by donee. If, at the time of the gift(s) you and your ex were not living together then there should be ...


4

You did not specify a country or the specific contracts that might rule your condominium. At least in some jurisdictions indeed the repair cost of private portions cannot be shared. Moreover, you may not be required to pay some costs for common portions if you refuse to do so and won't make use of them. Do I have to sue them to fix this issue? A lengthy law-...


3

You have to take the General Notes part in its full context. The relevant clause says The term “Common Area” as used herein means all portions of the Project except the Units, and without limiting the generality of the forgoing, all structural projections within a Unit which are required for the support of a Condominium, gas, water pipes, all sewers,...


2

You and the company are separate entities. Let’s say your company has a printer. If that printer as a used printer is worth $500 then the company can’t give it to you for free or sell it for less than the value, or it will be tax evasion. The company’s profits are lower than they should be, and your wallet contains more money than it should. The only legal ...


2

Yes such an arrangement can be made legally. Owners cannot be evicted. But a contract could provide for regular payments (rent) and that the right to use/occupy the property is contingent on those payments being made. It could even provide that if the payments are sufficiently behind, that a portion of that party's share would be forfeit to cover the amount ...


2

This depends entirely on which law applies to the divorce. For example, if this happens under Australian law then it falls within the jurisdiction of the Family Court (a Federal court as the Commonwealth has power over marriage, not the states). They say: You can agree and not involve the court. If you agree you can, but are not required to, have the court ...


2

Many states deal with trespass as an issue you can get an injunction for even if there is no damage to your property at all. For example, in Virginia, the circuit courts require a minimum of $4500 in damages if you are seeking money, but if you ask for an injunction to prevent repeated trespasses, they'll give it to you. I think the question mistakes ...


1

Well, your examples are sort of edge cases. In most circumstances, there's scant reason to want to improve someone else's property in the first place. And just because a legal remedy might be expensive for the plaintiff to obtain does not mean that it's cheap for the defendant. Thus it still has deterrent value.


1

Your remedy will likely depend on your ability to show that John is responsible for heating this space. Is there a contract which shows this? Is it a condo rule? From there you may be able to formulate a theory which might show John's failure to perform.


1

The Language Of The Court Order Is The Only Relevant Fact Your payment of the mortgage and utilities is only relevant for purposes of convincing a new bank you are obtaining a new mortgage with that you have the ability to pay (or to helping the judge decide what to do back in 2015). This documentation is irrelevant for purposes of what you are allowed to do ...


1

To get really technical: a sewer is an underground pipe for the carriage of sewage owned by a utility - a pipe that carries sewage that is privately owned is a sanitary drain (if underground) or sanitary plumbing (if above ground). The pipe that leaked is therefore part of the building's sanitary plumbing. That said, I don't think that the use of the word "...


1

Your example is very specific and mathematical. So I don't think I can answer it. But I can give you the general principles in play to guide your further research and study. If you are in the United States, there are two systems for dividing marital property during a divorce. The system that will apply depends on what state you live in. The two systems are:...


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