12

I believe that legally they can't force her to use sick leave since she has met the 40 hours minimum required as a salaried employee. Is this correct? Unfortunately, as far as the Department of Labor (DoL) is concerned, the employer is correct here, provided that this is company policy. First, there is no "40 hours minimum required", the DoL simply says ...


6

Anyone found not guilty may apply to the judge to have his legal costs paid out of central funds; this is not automatic, but is usual if the court agrees that the charges should not have been brought. The amount payable is set out by regulations depending on where the case was heard; since October 2012 it has been set at legal aid rates, which are unlikely ...


3

Most U.S. states provide zero compensation of any kind in this situation, although there are a few states that are exceptions. (Far more states provide compensation from conviction to release for a wrongfully convicted person.) Even in those few states that provide compensation to acquitted defendants, the compensation is typically set by statute and is ...


2

The premise that "CEO then has ABC hire XYZ as a consultant, paying XYZ $10mm per year" suggests that the board of directors is unaware of the CEO's ownership of XYZ. That almost always amounts to fraud and conflict of interest. The CEO in the hypothetical situation you describe failed his ethical (if not contractual) duty to timely disclose to ABC his ...


2

Interesting questions. Let's start with the simpler question: the requirement that options be exercised within 90 days of service termination, while very common, is frequently waived especially in the case of independent contractors. That shouldn't present a Section 409A issue. As to longer term options - I have to say I havne't seen one before. While it's ...


1

It really depends on the type of the case, and what exactly you anticipate the adverse party would do to "drag" you into a long litigation. It also depends on the litigation style of the adverse party. Generally, the court has a fair amount of discretion over award of attorney fees and court costs. It's best to talk to a lawyer and get some context-specific ...


1

Answering my own question after some more research (which I should have done in the first place). Yes, it's illegal both in the US and in the EU Many airlines do it anyway because they are desperate for cash and hoping that no government agency will enforce it. A trade group is actually lobbying to change the laws Airlines will do what they can to make you ...


1

Such a situation is at best ethically dubious. It is clearly a conflict of interest on the part of the CEO. If it is hidden from the board of directors it may well be fraud, and thus criminal. If it is disclosed somewhere in the documents submitted, but not obviously, it might not be fraud, but is still a violation of the CEO's duty to clearly disclose any ...


1

It is possible that the copyright owner of the original product would offer to pay people who report violations. I think I have heard of a few that will, but most won't. At least under US law, they have no obligation to make such payments unless they have offered to do so or contracted to do so. You could write or email the owner, and say "I know of a site ...


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