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You can jointly hire a lawyer Yes, they can jointly hire a lawyer, coming at the lawyer essentially as one single entity: a partnership. The lawyer will research both sides of the question, and give the partnership a fair report. The fee you pay may not deliver to one definitive answer, but it'll discuss all the likely angles. However, if one of them ...


9

How to resolve a bet on a question of law? should any of them later act in reliance on that answer and end up in a legal trouble, the answerer won't be liable. If said act[ion] in reliance on the answer is about a potential matter to which Bob and Rob would be the parties, Bob or Rob could consider filing suit for declaratory relief. The decision(s) in that ...


4

A lawyer is obligated to protect his client's interests and to carry out his client's directions in these matters. Not doing so would violate multiple ethical rules applicable to lawyers. Some of the relevant provisions of the American Bar Association's Model Rules of Professional Conduct which are the template for every state's ethical rules (some with ...


4

5 CFR 2635.102 provides definitions for 5 CFR Part 2635 (which contains 5 CFR 2635.502). (h) Employee means any officer or employee of an agency, including a special Government employee. It includes officers but not enlisted members of the uniformed services. It includes employees of a State or local government or other organization who are serving ...


3

Yes lawyers do this. quite often in fact. There are professional and publicity reasons of course, that should suffice to not give bad advice and harm your career. But there is also a legal reason. Lawyers are responsible for the advice they give (as most professionals). If they give bad advice, they may be liable for damages!


3

The U.S. FTC gave extensive guidance on this subject in March 2013. (You may have noticed shortly thereafter that conspicuous disclosures of free samples and compensation started popping up in reviews and posts around the web.) The FTC's FAQ covers this question in such detail I would just encourage people to visit it directly. However, as is the custom ...


3

"Agreement" is probably the first step: over what constitutes an authoritative source. As you allude, courts are authoritative, though access is limited to appropriately injured parties. Otherwise the court's opinion would be "advisory," which is typically proscribed. You might consider paralleling the structure often used for factual resolution of ...


1

Most legal work is not dispute resolution Sure, there are specialist litigators (called barristers in common-law jurisdictions outside the US) but most legal work is conveyancing, wills & probate, estate planning, businesses structure, contract drafting and advice, family law, criminal law and telling you why civil litigation is a bad idea. Most dispute ...


1

Is Medium at risk of legal action? They are, in as much as anyone or any company is due to the nature of civil law, i.e. just about anyone can take anyone else to civil court. That is where "legal conflicts of interest" are worked out. But I'd assume that Medium's lawyers have covered the bases in terms of adhering to state and federal laws that govern ...


1

Rule 1.7(a) of the the Model Rules of Professional Conduct, which are generally applicable in almost every state, says: A concurrent conflict of interest exists if ... there is a significant risk that the representation of one or more clients will be materially limited ... by a personal interest of the lawyer. So from there, the question becomes whether ...


1

According to ABA model rule 1.7, there is a conflict of interest if: there is a significant risk that the representation of one or more clients will be materially limited by the lawyer's responsibilities to another client, a former client or a third person or by a personal interest of the lawyer. Being the son of the opposing party is a conflict of ...


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