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23

In england-and-wales this would fall within the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and depends on whether he lacks the mental not physical, capacity to make the decision for himself. Can he: Understand the information relevant to the decision Retain that information Use or weigh that information as part of the process of making the decision Communicate that decision (...


12

In Washington state, a marriage could be challenged because a party lacked capacity to consent to the marriage or domestic partnership, either because of mental incapacity or because of the influence of alcohol or other incapacitating substances, or because a party was induced to enter into the marriage or domestic partnership by force or duress, or by ...


12

According to South Carolina law: SECTION 20-1-10. Persons who may contract matrimony. (A) All persons, except mentally incompetent persons and persons whose marriage is prohibited by this section, may lawfully contract matrimony. (The prohibited list includes close relatives, people who are already married, people under 16, and people of the same sex, ...


11

Based on the advice from @user6726, here's how I disputed the charge. First, I called FedEx customer service. They declined to waive the fee, and informed me that if I didn't pay, it would go to collections. So, I waited a few months and let the collection agency send me their version of the bill. Then, I sent the following reply (paraphrased) to the ...


10

In france, consent can be presumed from past actions and behavior. In this case, having a wedding planned for later the same week, rings bought, and so on would probably work. The same principle allows marriage of a dead fiancee.


9

“From your perspective you should not worry about asking permission to use reCaptcha as it is not you who is processing the data it is google and any GDPR compliance falls on them.“ This is plain wrong. If a user visits your website you are the controller of data collected on your website. Regardless of what entity collects that data. However in my non-...


8

The specifics probably depends on your province, but there are laws in Canada similar to those in the US whereby a person receiving unsolicited goods and services to pay or return the goods. For example, the Ontario Consumer Protection Act, 2002 §13 says (1) Except as provided in this section, a recipient of unsolicited goods or services has no legal ...


7

This could be covered by point 1(c) of Article 6: Processing shall be lawful only if and to the extent that at least one of the following applies: ... (c) processing is necessary for compliance with a legal obligation to which the controller is subject; ... It might also fall under point 1(f): ... (f) processing is necessary for the purposes of the ...


6

Most likely yes if you are subject to UK or EU laws: The EU ePrivacy directive and implementing laws such as PECR in the UK require that you obtain consent before accessing information on a user's device, unless that access is strictly necessary to perform a service requested by the user. Cookies and similar technologies such as LocalStorage are stored on ...


5

My interpretation of the GDPR when it comes to a contact form is as long as your privacy notice states that what data you collect in the contact form and what legal basis that data is used for you are fine. Someone submitting a contact form in my opinion is their consent to reply back to them regarding the data in which they have submitted. Another good ...


5

This is a large question, so I'll only put a spotlight on some misconceptions. Why can't Google use legitimate interest instead of consent to serve ads? A data controller such as Google must choose an appropriate legal basis per Art 6(1). But if the legal basis is consent, and the data subject declines or retracts consent, you can't do the processing ...


5

The exception is often called a Romeo and Juliet exception colloquially when applied to statutory rape laws. See, e.g. here. It is an exception to the age of capacity to consent to sexual conduct, not an exception to the capacity to consent to a contract. When children are very young (typically in the range of 7 to 12 as set by statute of common law, it is 6 ...


4

The only age of consent in England and Wales is 16. The relevant provision is Section 9 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003. 9 Sexual activity with a child (1) A person aged 18 or over (A) commits an offence if— (a) he intentionally touches another person (B), (b) the touching is sexual, and (c) either— (i) B is under 16 and A does not reasonably believe that B ...


4

I believe in this case, your company (OrgX) is a data processor and your customer's organization (OrgY) is the data controller. OrgY is responsible for establishing a lawful basis for sending you (OrgX) the personal data for their employees. Note that consent is just one of six lawful bases outlined in article 6(1). I'm no expert, but I believe OrgY's admin ...


4

Yes, since you default to no consent, ergo consent would have to be positive. It's rather unsatisfactory though as a sort of double-negative, and needs careful wording to make sure consent is informed. However, this may be a technical problem as it seems odd that you can't have an unchecked checkbox. Does the word 'checked' perhaps appear in the HTML? https:...


3

Am I correct in arguing that the LHD never really had implied consent to begin with? In other words, does the failure to honour the express refusal inform us about the legitimacy of prior claims of implied consent? No. They had implied consent and had not intent at the outset to dishonor it. They have violated the patient's privacy right when ...


3

Massachusetts is a 'two-party' state. So you'd have to have consent from them to record. You could probably travel to a 'one-party' state such as one of the states listed here and call them while recording. In a one-party state, only one of the parties to the conversation needs to know about the recording. In those states you don't even need to inform them. ...


3

Breathalyzer tests are distinct from blood tests because the former does not "implicat[e] significant privacy concerns" (see Birchfeld v. ND). A cell phone is like a blood test, because it implicates significant privacy concerns, especially the level of electro-snooping that would be required to determine if someone had recently committed a phone-use ...


3

The ePrivacy directive (Article 5(3)) requires prior informed consent for storage (or access) of information stored on a user's terminal equipment. In other words - you must ask users if they agree to most cookies and similar technologies before the site starts to use them. That is not always technically possible or creates catastrophic UX, so take a ...


3

He has to follow the law of the country he is in and those of which he is a citizen. A citizen is subject to their country's jurisdiction wherever they are, however, some laws are only enforced within a nation's boundaries and some have extra-territorial application. 18 U.S. Code § 2423 - Transportation of minors covers the US law (I don't speak Hungarian or ...


3

You didn't consent to being ripped off. You did however fail to grasp the terms under which you were permitted to park on their property, and you failed to pursue an alternative (such as looking for change; using a credit card). It is possible that you should have known that this was a no-change-given machine, since one can often see that there is no ...


3

"1) Can I use an pre checked tick box under GDPR?" Nope. "Silence, pre-ticked boxes or inactivity should not therefore constitute consent." (Recital 32) "2) Since GDPR also requires the data collector to ensure that the user is not under the age of 13 so I am planning to ask the users age only for that region i.e. EU Region. Now will simply mentioning ...


3

Doing this is OK according to the GDPR and other European laws. The relevant bit is GDPRs rules for Lawfulness of processing, and in particular Article 6 (1)b, which says that it is legal to do this if processing is necessary for the performance of a contract to which the data subject is party or in order to take steps at the request of the data subject ...


3

Beware, a lot of GDPR quotes ahead. Do we need a user's consent when being contacted by a contact form? No, Article 4(11) states: ‘consent’ of the data subject means any freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous indication of the data subject's wishes by which he or she, by a statement or by a clear affirmative action, signifies agreement to ...


3

Simply use a cookie to store consent. First consider the opposite. If a user does not agree to store cookies, a cookie is the only way to remember this, as you want to avoid a new pop-up on every page-load. Because this use of a cookie is functional, you don't need permission to store that cookie. You seem have the impression that you have to prove towards ...


3

Just below the section you quoted it says: (3) The victim’s prior sexual conduct is not a relevant issue in a prosecution under this section. There is no stated provision for the case you mention. I suspect that the law would apply. Whether the authorities would choose to prosecute in such a case is a very different question. There might be caselaw of ...


3

Assuming that the owner of the hard drive (irrespective of if that owner is a government or private person) is legally entitled to take possession of the hard drive then they can do so subject to the fact that they generally cannot commit a crime to do so (e.g. trespass or damage to property). If the person in possession of the hard drive refuses to hand it ...


3

I gather that the numerous ramifications you outline are merely contexts and that your main concern is about the application of contract law (contract law in the U.S. does not really vary among states). Thus, I will not really delve in the intricacies of --for instance-- privacy or copyright issues arising from the commercial use of a person's likeness that ...


3

Did you consent because you could have seen a poster? Broadly speaking, yes - but its unlikely that what you consented to was a contract. Conditions of Entry The posters that you describe are more likely to be conditions of entry rather than terms of a contract. The controller of premises is entitled to restrict access to that premises and impose ...


3

Do I need to inform the user about storing the score locally? No, there is no need as long as you don't transmit, store or process any personal info. It's doubtful that the score could be considered personal info, but you're not sending it to your servers in any way, so you don't seem to be processing it anyway. Do I need consent for using non-personal ...


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