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Given your reference to "consumer court", I assume this is in India, so you are also concerned with the Consumer Protection Act. Under the act, your complain would have to be about one of a number of things, including most likely (iii) the services hired or availed of or agreed to be hired or availed of by him suffer from deficiency in any ...


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When a company sells you things and ships them to you, they are obligated to actually get them to you: they can't say "We gave it to our shipper, it's your responsibility now". The same is true with a return: you have to be sure that the stuff is received. The typical way of doing that is to insure the shipment and get a tracking number, so that if ...


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I second ohwilleke's succinct analysis, and would like to support it from at least the warranty angle under a reading of the U.C.C. in California: “It is important to note . . . that even statements of opinion can become warranties under the code if they become part of the basis of the bargain.” (Hauter v. Zogarts (1975) 14 Cal.3d 115, fn. 10 [120 Cal.Rptr. ...


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A U.S. auto manufacturer promises in writing that its vehicles will, for the life of their vehicles, receive free hydrogen at its charging stations. . . . The written promise was related to the workmanship of the vehicle in connection with its software and hardware components. Was a warranty created? It sounds like there were two separate promises. A ...


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A U.S. auto manufacturer promises in writing that its vehicles will, for the life of their vehicles, receive free hydrogen at its charging stations. Was a warranty created? No, and it creates no obligation to provide maintenance for free either. The exact wording of the writing might make a difference, but the promise of free hydrogen does not imply a ...


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In case of fraud, the matter may also be a crime. In that case: Not only does the '63 Convention provide that the sending State's national may be represented generally in matters when they are detained, arrested etc., but, for example, under Community law, if Bob is a citizen of the EU (per paragraph (1) of COUNCIL DIRECTIVE (EU) 2015/637; "Citizenship ...


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No Consular assistance is far more limited than you think it is. For example, for australia, among the things the consulate can’t help you with is: intervene in another country’s court proceedings or legal matters including employment disputes, commercial disputes, criminal cases, and family law matters or child custody disputes


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