New answers tagged

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if he provides me with copyrighted material that I add to the website, would I be liable? No. Instead, your friend would be liable both directly and vicariously. Direct liability would arise from the fact that your friend himself sends to you the contents he wants in the website. Vicarious liability stems from you making the website on behalf of your friend,...


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The only concern is have is, if he provides me with copyrighted material that I add to the website, would I be liable? Yes. What kind of contract could I have him agree to, for example is this where indemnification comes in? Yes, they can indemnify you. But you would have to sue your friend to enforce this if you get sued and if they go bankrupt you ...


4

It isn't necessarily "illegal" (in the sense you are committing a crime) but you may be in violation of a verbal contract (which would fall under tort law). Let's take this a bit further. Perhaps Joe Schmoe gave you his debit card information so that you could make deposits for him and he said you could take $5 out for yourself for the trouble. This is a ...


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According to their terms of service, which were accepted when the original account holder signed up, password must not be shared outside of that person's household. If we assume there is nothing in the terms of service preventing you from sharing the password, then the assumption is wrong, so nothing changed. Joe hasn't given you a license to do anything. ...


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Basically nothing, most likely. I am not a lawyer, but I think it's most likely that very little would need to be changed to be counted as "transformative", at least in America. Recently, in the case of Carl Benjamin (Sargon of Akkad) vs Akilah Hughes, it was found that Benjamin's video "SJW Levels of Awareness" was transformative Fair Use, even though it ...


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Not very novel What you are talking about is a derivative work. This is arguably the most famous example: It's an interesting example because Leonardo da Vinci did not have copyright in the original but Marcel Duchamp and Francis Picabia do have copyright in the derivative. Even though the changes are physically small, they are enough. A crucial factor ...


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You can licence your copyright under as many licences as you like to as many people as you like It's your copyright - you can do what you want with it. What you can't do is give someone an exclusive licence and then give licences to others - that would be a breach of contract with the exclusive licensee. How you let people know about the available ...


3

Copyright almost certainly exists in the images, since presumably someone took those pictures and so they would own the copyright of those images. However, that doesn't mean you don't own the film, you just that don't own the copyright. You can have it developed to see what's there without copying the images. Just tell the developer you only want the film ...


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Sorry, I'll have to opt for a no-quotes answer. The question is, does your answer have the scintilla of creativity required for copyright protection? That creativity arises from identifying relevant text from elsewhere, deciding how much is relevant, eliminating superfluous verbiage, collecting a relevant set of such texts (assuming that the parts of an ...


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This is difficult. The problem is that a mathematical algorithm isn't patentable. You can patent an invention that wouldn't work without that algorithm, but not the mathematical algorithm. For example, MP3 compression has been patented, but FFT (the mathematical algorithm behind it) hasn't. Matthew has copyright protection automatically. He can patent a ...


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A patent protects an invention, which is an abstract idea that exists on paper. Copyright protects the specific implementation of an idea. Matthew would not be able to protect his algorithm with copyright alone. Someone else could implement the algorithm with a different program. This would not be a copyright violation, unless it copies the code verbatim ...


1

Is there any way one can have their own intellectual property licensed to their own company, such that the person owns that IP and not the company? Yes. This is quite common. The ideal asset protection strategy is to have one company that deals with customers, one that deals with suppliers, one that employs and one that owns property (including ...


3

Yes. A license is a legal form of permission to do something (usually, to use a particular property, whether real or digital or intellectual) and the conditions applied to that use. Different licenses for the same property are extremely common, for example, a free license for hobby or non-profit work and a paid license for commercial usage. Other ...


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Unfortunately the lines are a bit fuzzy, but you shouldn't trip over any doing what you describe. You don't say which country you are in, so the following applies to the USA. Other countries have similar laws but the details vary. Writing or talking about how to play the game is entirely unrestricted; the words are your own and you can say whatever you ...


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Not the free version Your use is commercial so you have to buy the software which (presumably) allows commercial use.


2

The core issue here is: do you have (partial) copyright in the work? without copyright, you have no right to issue a license – but you can pass on the same license you received when you made an adaptation to the work you hold partial copyright, but your choice of license depends on the license you received for the original work under CC-BY you can license ...


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Legal unless you violate copyright. Screenshots will probably be fair use. The manuals/how-tos need to be your originals, not copies from anywhere.


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If you are showing something publicly accessible and not copyrighted, then you should be totally fine. It couldn't hurt to contact some of your customers and get consent though. If you say here are some examples of other companies utilizing our product, that's very different than saying here are other companies that LOVE OUR PRODUCT. It is an ...


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There's a key phrase you omitted from your quote of 14(e): non-exclusive Qualcomm gets pretty much unlimited rights to use content submitted as part of the contest, but those rights are not granted exclusively. Contest participants are still free to make use of their submissions in almost any way they want, so long as that use doesn't involve granting ...


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No Participants keep all the rights to their Ip. They just give the competition organizer basically the same rights they have themselves.


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Alright. I'm going to answer this question myself.\ in case someone else ever comes looking for something like this. I had about an hour-long conversation with a BMI Business rep this morning. I had a misunderstanding about the PRO licensing. Apparently, by copyright law, all bars, restaurants, and businesses that have to have a PRO license, must ...


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I really hate to put my clients at risk, but processing my entire music library to tag each song for which PRO they are represented by will be nearly impossible! So what? You run a business; it's your responsibility to comply with the law. If that costs you time and/or money then that is a cost of doing business and should be reflected in the rates you ...


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"But he doesn't even sing!" If music only consisted of lyrics, you'd have a point. But you already said exactly how the infringement happened: playing the guitar. The content usage is clear: the video uses the song's melody, and therefore is infringing on copyright. It doesn't matter how long or little is played. Copyright infringement suits have been ...


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That has been explained in another question: Copyright applies if you copy and doesn’t apply if you don’t copy. If you don’t copy you can do what you like. If you copy it must be allowed by law, or you must have a license which includes following the terms of the license. Apply these principles to all your questions.


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You need permission to copy unless fair use applies Does this mean that when someone sends you their resume, it is unlawful to pass it on to others unless the author gives permission? First note that copyright law only applies to copying. If someone were to give you a physical copy of their resume (assuming such a thing would happen in this day and age) ...


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