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1

It's pretty black and white: no. Almost every country in the world has joined the Berne Convention, and has copyright terms meeting the minimum standards of that convention (at least 50 years after the death of the author). Presumably, these textures are the original ones created by Markus Persson, so various special rules such as the US's 95 years for ...


1

It depends on what you mean by "computer program". If you're referring to the algorithm that the computer operates, no, you can't copyright it, because it's a process or a system of rules, and those can't be copyrighted. However, if you're talking about the specific expression of an implementation of that process, then that can be copyrighted. So, for ...


6

In addition to the copyright itself as answered in the other answers, it is worth noting that while the code itself falls under copyright, WHAT the program does is usually not part of the copyright. Thus if you have implemented a program A to read data from an image and search for specific patterns in it your program itself is protected. BUT if someone ...


56

All computer programs are not just copyrightable, they are protected by copyright as soon as they are put into fixed form (for example, as soon as I type it on my computer which will save it as a file on a disk). The copyright owner doesn't have to take any actions whatsoever to have a computer program protected by copyright. It’s not just computer programs, ...


38

Except for limited circumstances, all computer programs are protected by copyright (an exception would be a program created by the US government). Therefore, to overcome copyright protection, the creator must grant a license to others to use and redistribute software with some specified degree of freedom. This is what gave rise to the myriad open source ...


1

Your main protection will be copyright; if anyone copies part of your site then you can sue them. If you hire someone as an employee then anything they write in the course of their employment will be a "work for hire" and hence the copyright will be owned by you or your company. It wouldn't hurt to require all code files to carry a copyright header saying ...


-1

IANAL but here is what I would do : First of all, I suggest you use an online versionning service such as git or subversion. Not only may it ease your developpement but it can proof that you first developped it in case someoene is actually stealing you. Next, when you hire someone, make him sign a contract where it is specified that what he develops there ...


1

You don't give a jurisdiction, but from the DMCA tag I'm assuming you are interested in the USA. There is no hard rule about what counts as "fair use". The law lists 4 factors for courts to take into account: The purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes; the ...


2

Ideas cannot be protected by either patents or copyright. If you have a great idea for a game, and I hear of it, I can use that great idea myself. What you want to do if you hire a software developer: Before you hire them, you don't tell anything about your idea that could let them copy it. If you have to tell them, then you make them sign an NDA (a Non ...


3

Games can be protected by patent. You get some protection through copyright, but only on things like artwork and the precise text of the rules; someone could copy the ideas of the game with different artwork and not violate your copyright. You would need a patent in each country you want to protect it in. In general patents are expensive and complicated. ...


2

You can't, in general, know whether a distributor of a work has permission to distribute, or is a pirate site. I verified that they have posted an illegal copy of a work that I created, and I know that I did not grant permission to them (or anyone) to infringe my copyright. Both hosting and downloading works without permission is a violation of copyright ...


1

If you read their user agreement, you will see that the content which is available to those who have a subscription may be owned by the company, or may be owned by users who upload such content. They allow content owners to specify license terms. §7 of the agreement is where the uploader licenses material to the company: you hereby grant to Musescore a ...


0

If the copyright on the book still holds, then a translation is a derivative work. This may not be related to the publishing house, btw. In the US, for example, the copyright exists for X number of years after the death of the original author or Y number of years after the original publication. Even if the original author sold all rights to a publishing ...


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