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3

What the CC-BY-SA license does here is to contractify moral rights. Many countries have a right to be recognized as the author for your artistic works. This “moral right” is somewhat independent from the economic aspects of copyright, and is often not transferable. For example, this answer is licensed under CC-BY-SA 4.0 but I am subject to German law. I ...


2

To address a comment by OP on Paul White's answer, about the paragraph "and from How do I properly attribute material offered under a Creative Commons license?:" Additionally, you may satisfy the attribution requirement by providing a link to a place where the attribution information may be found. The comment was: It would seem if the method of ...


4

Yes and no. Yes: If you post something to a personal website or blog, you can use whatever license and requirements (as long as they are legal) that you like. If you require people to strip naked and dance in Antarctica, then that’s your requirement. No: If you are posting to a website you don’t own, they will have requirements you have to agree to before ...


40

I don't see how. Remember that a license is a contract where the author gives permission to copy (modify, redistribute, remix, etc) a copyrighted work, provided that the licensee fulfills the stated conditions. If the license is not in effect, then we revert to the default situation under copyright law, which is that the potential licensee has no rights to ...


2

You may surely create your own license if you please, and use ideas from the Creative Commons license if you wish, but it would not then be a CC license, and you may not use the trademarked "Creative Commons" name for the license. Also the actual license text is protected by copyright. If you license the work under the CC "-SA" provision, ...


3

Fonts are weird, especially in the United States. In the U.S., the physical shape - the "typeface" - is not copyrightable. Seriously. The digital code which specifies the "vector art" lines and curves of the character is copyrightable i.e. the "font". But you can easily "launder" fonts by printing all the characters ...


3

The owner of the font copyright, who is probably not Microsoft, could (if the owner learns of the unauthorized use) sue for copyright infringement. The owner could, in the united-states, collect actual damages (probably the retail value of the fonts) or statutory damages, which can be anything from $750 to $30,000 as the court thinks just. In a case like the ...


2

You are in general correct, KBurchfiel. A code snippet such as import math; or For i := 1 to 10 print i; has no originality, and is not protected by copyright. A post eplaining the meaning an usage of such a snippet might well be original enough to be protected by US copyright, indeed it probably would. But the code on its own would not be. Anyone ...


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