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The closest the Supreme Court has gotten to criminal liability for official acts seems to be Nixon v. Fitzgerald, 457 U.S. 731 (1982). There it addressed civil liability and held that the U.S. President "is entitled to absolute immunity from damages liability predicated on his official acts." It's unclear how the Justices would decide criminal ...


3

The President has absolute immunity from civil and criminal liability for the consequences of his discretionary official policy decisions (as do all legislators at all levels of government, all prosecutors, all judges, and many top policymaking elected and appointed officials like Governors, Mayors, a cabinet secretaries). He cannot be prosecuted after he ...


3

The short answer is "yes". There is U.S. Supreme Court authority that supports this position, In particular, United States v. Laub, 385 U.S. 475 (1967), Cox v. Louisiana, 379 U.S. 599 (1965), and Raley v. Ohio, 360 U.S. 423 (1959), stand for the proposition that a defendant may not be punished for actions taken in good faith reliance upon ...


2

There is no Federal or State law currently that has this type of requirement. A lot of employers, especially larger ones, have health screening and may reject an employee access to the property until they are tested, but this is voluntary by the employer (not the employee). For example, my employer asks that we complete an online questionnaire before going ...


1

can really anyone in Germany call the police on others without proof of anything? Anyone anywhere can call the police without proof of anything as long as they have a phone. The question is, what will the police do about it. Police in Germany are more professional and less corrupt than in many countries in the world (e.g. they are much less corrupt than ...


1

Are you “legally allowed to enter your workplace“? Or are you legally allowed during normal work hours when the premises is open for business? Permission to enter can be conditional and a locked door is generally a big denial of permission. However, let’s assume you have permission to be inside. Do you have permission to break in? That’s a question that will ...


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