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6

This would be illegal in Australia (Criminal Code Act 1995 part 10.7: any unauthorised impairment of electronic communication to or from a computer), the US (Computer Fraud and Abuse Act) and any other jurisdiction that I can think of. There is no exception allowing vigilante action in case a person has a reasonable belief that the material on a website is ...


5

Depends on the purpose of the society and physical location of its members. A secret society aiming to coordinate bank robberies would be pretty much illegal anywhere. A secret society sharing photos of cats would be fine in most parts of the world. I'm not sure about the jurisdiction. All the places in which members live? Where the servers are located?...


2

The Federal Election Commission (FEC) recently put out a summary of what constitutes a thing of value. While it is a summary from the FEC, I still think it's relevant because it uses the term thing of value, which, as the summary notes, appears in (quoting from the summary) "many criminal statutes throughout the United States". Because of that, I will quote ...


2

If I were you, I would look at Skilling v. United States. https://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/09pdf/08-1394.pdf Start at page six of that PDF, where it reads: Section 1346, which proscribes fraudulent deprivations of “the intangible right of honest services,” is properly confined to cover only bribery and kickback schemes. Because Skilling’s ...


2

Would that itself raise any red flags/point out legal issues? to what end is it a "late fee" vs. "imprisonment for tax evasion?" A taxpayer's voluntary payment/filing of overdue taxes is very unlikely to lead to imprisonment or prosecution. Here voluntary means that the tax department (example: IRS in the US) did not even have to allocate resources for ...


1

Could this US victim accuse this UK scammer? Yes Since uk and us has different legislations, how should the victim accuse the scammer? Report the scam to the relevant US authority (which is, I think, the FBI) They investigate and pass the information to the relevant UK authority (the Metropolitan Police, I think) They jointly investigate and if/when ...


1

That's just called friends tbh. There's no laws about talking to people online, if you aren't doing anything illegal. Secret societies aren't a legal entity. It's just a group of people.


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