7

In theory, a store can ban you or anyone else for any reason except those protected by law against discrimination. As a practical matter, you potentially have various forms of recourse. The first thing to do is to write the the CEO of the chain, with a long detailed letter describing the incidents, and naming names. Most CEO's don't want to deal with this ...


6

LegalZoom did not get it wrong. The case Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission was under Colorado law (hence it was against the Colorado Civil Rights Commission), not federal law. LZ stated that 20 states have enacted laws against discrimination based on sexual orientation, and Colorado is one of those states. The issue was heard by SCOTUS ...


4

If I may paraphrase the scenario: The customer has a contract with the insurer The customer is contemplating undergoing a certain procedure and is unsure if it is covered under the contract The customer calls the insurer to ask this specific question The insurer says "yes" The customer undergoes the procedure The insurer refuses to pay on the ground that it ...


4

No, you cannot ask for proof/documentation. According to the U.S. Department of Justice: In situations where it is not obvious that the dog is a service animal, staff may ask only two specific questions: (1) is the dog a service animal required because of a disability? and (2) what work or task has the dog been trained to perform? Staff are not allowed to ...


4

This is actually pretty standard. You have a contract with a business to provide some service, and you get a bargain on the price of the service as long as you stay with them for some period, such as 2 years. You could get the 'pay as you go' option which doesn't have a termination fee, but that costs more if you are sure you can commit to what you signed up ...


3

That article is dated 2015, and there have been some changes since then in this still developing field of law. The case referred to was probably Masterpiece Cake Shop, after on;y the first round of proceedings in it. Note that the Federal ruling in Masterpiece did not reach the merits of the issue, holding that the Colorado proceedings were biased and must ...


3

Yes, it's absolutely legal. It turns out that UK retailers offer replacement out of their own politeness and are not required to do so by law. If they gave you refund then that's all they need to do.


3

I'm going to go out on a limb somewhat and say that claims made by a customer service representative are not binding, and are only advisory. The reason is that the company is only bound by the terms of your agreement with them. It is possible to change the terms of a contract, but especially with an oral change there would be a substantial challenge in ...


3

If this requirement was not made before rendering the service, you are under no obligation to accept the term. You and the service provider must now find an agreeable method of payment. You still owe the provider but if you are compelled to pay then the provider will be compelled to be more accommodating in their allowed payment methods (cash, at least). As ...


3

There is no IP in ideas! There is copyright in writing it down - they can't use your exact words without permission. However, sending it to them in the form of a suggestion would give them a pretty much unassailable argument that you have given them an implicit licence. You can patent an invention (not an idea), claim IP in a trade mark (also, not an idea),...


2

You would need to read the terms of the warranty and of any statutory warranty that applies (for example, in Australia goods must last a "reasonable time" by law - a "reasonable time" for a washing machine is 8-12 years depending on price). In general, the goods are warranted to operate for the warranty period: if they stop working in that period then the ...


2

A store is allowed to ban anyone from service, for any reason (except for discriminatory reasons, e.g. racism, sexism etc). The store is private property, and reserve the absolute right to deny entry.


2

It may be illegal for you to record a phone conversation or Skype-like session (i.e. voice recording), unless you get permission of all parties (that depends on where you and they are located). There are "reasonable expectation of privacy" considerations that are very unlikely to apply to a phone call, but could apply to a Skype session (owing to quirks in ...


1

If PayPal are in breach of their contract you can sue for damages Economic loss is calculable and there are various methodologies for doing so. Your lawyer will probably have you engage an expert witness to do so. No doubt PayPal will have their own expert to explain to the court why your expert is FoS (and vice-versa). However, it’s extremely unlikely ...


1

In Australia, services sold, hired or leased for less than $40,000 (or for any amount if they are normally bought for household or personal use) must comply with Australian Consumer Law with respect to Consumer Guarantees - this would cover most software products except for bespoke high-end business applications. In Australian Competition and Consumer ...


1

It would depend on the terms and conditions of the gift card. If the gift card is a present of the shop owner, then they can set (within reason) the terms and conditions they like. If I buy a gift card for a shop to give to someone as a birthday present, I wouldn't expect any restrictions. If there were restrictions, I'd likely not buy that gift card. If ...


1

No. In general, a business is not required to provide proof of interaction with a customer, though if you sue them for breach of contract because they failed to do something they are required to do, they would need to provide the proof to the court that they actually did it, if that is their claim. It is always possible that there is some contractual ...


1

There is "warranty", which is what the seller or manufacturer gives you voluntarily, and "statutory rights", which is what the laws of your country gives you. You'd have to read the exact terms and conditions. In extreme cases, your country should have laws that specify exactly what for example "within one year from the date of the purchase" would mean. In ...


1

Like the others asked, you need make clear where in the world you are talking about. My brother owns a bar in London England - My understanding is if you have seats for five or more people, then you must have washrooms during business opening hours. If the business is closed, or if you are not a customer, they do not have to let you in the premises, let ...


1

Sadly, in the case of insolvency, yes. Insolvency is when a company is unable to pay its debts as and when they fall due. When the directors believe their company is in this state it is their duty to apoint an administrator. Dick Smith passed into external administration a few days ago. At that point all creditors (including people who have gift cards/paid ...


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